William Grimshaw’s Records in

New Hampshire after the Revolutionary War

 

 

Portion of William Grimshaw’s 1790 Census Record in Lyman Town, New Hampshire, Indicating Himself, His Wife, and Two Children

 

 

(Note: Webpage in preparation)

 

Home Page

 

William Grimshaw fought in the American Revolutionary War on the side of the Colonials. The records of his service in Hazen’s Regiment are described on a companion webpage; the latest is dated 1783. After the war, William settled in New Hampshire, where he apparently had a family and remained for more than 20 years. William’s life in New Hampshire is described on another companion webpage.

 

During his New Hampshire life, at least 20 direct (and 2 indirect) records of his presence were created, including land transactions, census tallies, road petitions, inventory and tax, and other records. The records discovered so far are presented on this webpage and cover William’s life in New Hampshire from about 1789 to around 1811.

 

 

Introduction

 

 

Webpage Credits

 

Overview of William Grimshaw’s Post-war Life

 

 

Lyman Town, 1789-1792

 

 

Land Purchase in Lyman Town,  1789

 

Road Petition in Lyman Town, 1789

 

Census Record in Lyman Town, 1790

 

Bounty Land Warrant, 1790

 

William Grimshaw Voted as “Tithing Man,” 1791

 

School District Established, Lyman Town, 1791

 

Land Sale in Lyman Town, 1792

 

William Grimshaw Voted as “Saxon” and Takes Oath of Office, 1792

 

 

Bath Town, 1792-1796

 

 

Inventory and Tax Records, Bath Town, 1794 to 1796

 

 

Coventry (Benton) Town, 1800

 

 

Census Record in Coventry (Benton) Town, 1800

 

 

Haverhill Town, 1800-1811

 

 

Published Marriage Intention of William Blair and Betsey Grimshaw, 1800

 

Inventory Record, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

Highway Tax Record, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

County, Minister, School and Town Tax, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

Highway Tax Record, Haverhill Town, 1802

 

Town, County, School and Minister Tax, Haverhill Town, 1802

 

Promissory Note, Samuel Chase to William Grimshaw, and Subsequent Judgment, August 1802

 

Land Purchase in Haverhill Town, 1803

 

Petition to be Excused from Support of Minister John Smith, 1805

 

Land Sale in Haverhill Town, 1806

 

Census Record in Haverhill, 1810

 

Zephaniah Grimshaw and Jerusha Hunter Marriage Record, Haverhill Town, 1811

 

 

Recapitulation

 

 

Recapitulation of William Grimshaw’s Movements, and Family, in New Hampshire

 

What Happened After New Hampshire?

 

References

 

 

 

    • Webpage Credits

 

Most of the records on this webpage were obtained at the Family History Library of the Latter-Day Saints in Salt Lake City, Utah. Bill O’Halloran found most (if not all) of these records during earlier research in New England in 2000. Bill not only directed the author to many of these New Hampshire records, but he also provided essential background infromation during several phone conversations. This webpage is thus truly a collaborative effort between Bill and the website author.

 

Many other (probable) descendants of William Grimshaw have also been involved in the research effort and have provided additional information. In particular, Barbara Bonner and Calvin Lamb deserve special mention for their work in “ferreting out” the family history of William and his descendants.

 

    • Overview of William Grimshaw’s Post-war Life

 

The last Revolutionary War record for William is that of his discharge from Hazen’s Regiment in June, 1783. The next known record for William is in January 1788, almost five years later, when he is recorded in land transaction and other records in Lyman Town, New Hampshire. Nearly all of the subsequent records of William’s life are from New Hampshire, where he apparently settled and lived from 1789 until at least 1811.

 

The fact that William served as a fifer in the War may indicate that he was quite young (say, age 16 to 18) when he served from January 1782 to June 1783. If so, he would have been born about 1765, and thus was about age 22 when his presence in New Hampshire was first recorded in 1789. If he left the state in 1813, he would have then been about 48 years old.

 

During his more than years in New Hampshire, William lived with his family in the Town of Bath and the surrounding Towns of Lyman (to the north), Coventry-Benton (southeast), and Haverhill (south). This area is in western New Hampshire, near the Connecticut River. As noted, the records demonstrating his presence there include land purchases and sales, censuses, and miscellaneous Town records, such as inventory and tax records.

 

    • Land Purchase in Lyman Town,  1789

 

One of the earliest records of William after his discharge from Hazen’s Regiment in 1783 is a 50-acre land purchase (for 20 pounds) that was recorded on January 13, 1789. The transaction is listed in the Grafton County Grantee Indexand is worded as shown below in the Grafton County Land Records5 (v. 15, p. 134-135.) An image of the record is shown in Figure 4.

 

 

Know all men by there presents that I Asa Parker of Lyman in the county of Grafton and state of Newhampshire, Yeoman – for and in consideration of the sum of twenty pounds lawfull money, paid me by William Grimshaw of Lyman aforesaid, have conveyed and by these presents do give grant and convey unto the said William Grimshaw, his heirs, executors administrators and assigns fifty acres of land in said Lyman being part of the lot number thirty two, the original right of Samuel Wilmot beginning at the south east corner thereof and runing eighty [rods inserted] three rods on the east line thence turning off and running on a parralel line with the North line one hundred rods thence turning off and running a parralel line with the west line of said lot keeping the same distance of one hundred rods to the south line thereof thence on said South line to the bounds began at reserving for the proprietors use a two rod road on the east line of said lot and another of the same width through the premises of it may be wanted –. To have and to hold the same to the said William Grimshaw and his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns forever hereby warranting and defending the same against the claims and demands of all persons or person whatsoever – .

 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this (?) Day of January. Anno Domini 1789.

 

Signed, sealed and delivered Asa Parker (seal)

 

In the presents of us State of New Hampshire Grafton Co.

 

Jonathan Knap Haverhill 21st January 1792

 

Lawton Drury

 

Abel (?) Knap

 

Personally appeared Asa Parker and acknowledged the above written instrument to be his free act and deed

 

Before me Jacob Hurd Just. Peace –

 

Grafton Co.    March 27 1792    Received recorded and examined

 

B Woosman (?) Jr.

 


Figure 4. Image of the record of William Grimshaw’s purchase of land from Asa Parker5. The portion of the record on p. 134 is shown in a. The portion on p. 135 is shown in b.

 

 

a. Portion of Record on p. 134:

 

 


 

b. Portion of Record on p. 135:

 

 

 

    • Road Petition in Lyman Town, 1789

 

Records related to petitions for roads near William Grimshaw’s land in Lyman Town appear in Town records6 (p. 17-18) for January 3, 1789. Two of the records are shown in Figure 5 below. The first record includes William as one of three petitioners (John Davis and Samuel Parker are the other two). The second record is a petition by Jon A. Moulton and Daniel Moulton, “Select men.” Both records make reference to William’s land in Lyman Town.

Figure 5. Image of entries in Lyman town record6 regarding a road that “strikes” William Grimshaw’s property. The portion of the record on p. 17 is in 5a, and the portion on p. 18 is in 5b.

 

 

a. Portion of the record on p. 17

 

 


 

b. Portion of the record on p. 18

 

 

 

It is interesting to note that the date of these records (January 3, 1789) slightly predates the land transaction record (January 13, see preceding section.)

 

A third road petition, this one just from William Grimshaw, is dated about 6 months later — June 22, 17896. An image is shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6. Road petition record6 to Lyman Town Selectmen from William Grimshaw, dated June 22, 1789.

 

 

    • Census Record in Lyman Town, 1790

 

The first U.S. census was conducted under the mandate of Congress in 1790. This census7 found William Grimshaw living in Lyman Town with his family of four, shown as follows:

 

 

1 free white male of 16 years and upward, including heads of families

 

1 free white male under 16 years

 

2 free white females, including heads of families

 

 

A copy of the entry in the census book is presented in Figure 7. This record indicates that at this time William and his wife had a son under 16 and a daughter of unknown age.

Figure 7. Image of the 1790 census book7 entry for William Grimshaw (9th entry), showing his residence in Lyman Town with a family totaling four in number.

 

 

 

 

    • Bounty Land Warrant, 1790

 

While he was residing in Lyman Town, William received a Bounty Land Warrant, dated March 25, 1790, for his service in the Revolutionary War. An image of this document8 is shown in Figure 8. According to the background information provided with the copy of the document, the warrant was apparently for land located in Ohio, not in New York as were many of the grants for veterans who served in Hazen’s Regiment. Additional information on the Bounty Land Warrant, and the land grants in New York, is given in the companion webpage on William’s Revolutionary War service.

Figure 8. Image of Bounty Land Record8 for William Grimshaw (warrant number 13129.)

 

 

    • William Grimshaw Voted as “Tithing Man”, 1791

 


On March 15, 1791 William was voted as “tithing man” at a town meeting of Lyman Town. An image of the Town record9 (p. 31) is shown in Figure 9.

 

Figure 9. Image of Lyman Town record9 showing William Grimshaw voted as tithing man (11th action during the town meeting.)

 

 

    • School District Established, 1791

 

Later in the same year (November 10), the Lyman Town governing body (“selectmen”) voted that “the next (school) destrick for Schooling Shall take in up as far as moses Eastman and So on as far as Wiam Grimshaw.” An image of the record10 (p. 36) is shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10. Image of record10 of action by Lyman Town to create a school district up to (land owned by) William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • William Grimshaw Voted as “Saxon” and Takes Oath of Office, 1792

 

On March 13 of the following year, 1792, William was voted by Lyman Town as “Saxon.” On the same date he took the oath of office as Saxon. An image of the record11 showing the vote (p. 39) is given in Figure 11a, and an image of the record12 of the oath of office (p. 41) is shown in Figure 11b.

Figure 11. Images of records of William Grimshaw’s selection and oath of office as Saxon.

 

 

a. Record11 of William’s being voted as Saxon (p. 39).

 

 


 

b. Record12 of William’s taking oath of office as Saxon (p. 41).

 

 

 

    • Land Sale in Lyman Town, 1792

 

About two years after he bought the 50 acres in Lyman Town, William sold it to Jacob Rowell. The transaction recorded on January 9, 1792 and is in the Grafton County Grantor Index13 and in the Grafton County Land Records14 (v. 15, p. 135.) The wording is as shown below. An image of the transaction is shown in Figure 11.

 

 

Know all men by these presents that I William Grimshaw of Lyman in the county of Grafton and the state of New Hampshire Cordwainer for and in consideration of the sum of fifty pounds of lawfull money paid by Jacob Rowell of Bath in said county and state aforesaid Yeoman have conveyed and by these presents do give, grand and convey unto the said Jacob Rowell his heirs executors administrators and assigns fifty acres of land in said Lyman being part of the lot number thirty two of the original right of Samuel Wilmot, beginning at the southeast corner thereof and running eighty rods three rods on the east line thence turning off and running on a paralel line with the North line one hundred rods thence turning off and running a paralel line with the west line of said lot keeping the same distance of one hundred rods to the south line thereof thence on said south line to the bound began at reserving for the proprietors use a two rod road on the line of said lot and another of the same width through the premises if it may be wanted. –-

 

 

 

To have and to hold the same to the said Jacob Rowell and his heirs executors, administrators and assigns forever hereby warranting and defending the same against the claims and demands of all persons or person whatsoever. In witness whereof I have hereonto set my hand and seal this ninth day of January 1792
–

 

In presents of us William Grimshaw (seal)

 

Joshua Bedel State of Newhampshire Grafton Co

 

Isaac Moor Bath 27th January 1792 Personally appeared

 

William Grimshaw and acknowledged the within written instrument to be his free act and deed (?) before me Jacob Hurd Just. Peace

 

Grafton Co.             March 27th AD 1792 Received for record

 

Recorded & examined B. Woosman (?) Jr.

 

 

William sold the 50 acres for a substantial amount more than he had paid for it two years earlier (50 pounds vs 20 pounds.) The term “cordwainer” indicated that William was a shoemaker.

Figure 12. Image of the record14 of sale of land to Jacob Rowell by William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • Inventory and Tax Records, Bath Town, 1794 to 1796

 

A total of eight inventory and tax records have been found in the Bath Town records15 for William Grimshaw for the years 1793 to 1796. These records are summarized as shown below. An image of a representative record (1794, p. 171) is shown in Figure 13.

 

 

p. 133: “Copy of the Inventory for the Year 1793”

 

 

 

Polls from Eighteen to 70: 1

 

Cattle and horses which have been Winterd 4 Winters: 2

 

Sum Total: 13 s.

 

 

 

p. 139: “Copy of the School, town, and Bridge Tax”

 

 

 

Inventory: 13 s.

 

Specie for Schooling: 2s, 8-1/2 d

 

Wheat at 5% for Town Charges: 4s, 1d

 

Wheat at 4% per Bushel for Building the Bridge: 7s, 7d

 

 

 

p. 167: “Inventory of the Town of Bath for the Year 1794 – for what the Inhabitants possessed the 1st day in the month April”

 

 

 

No. Polls: 1

 

No. of Cows: 1

 

Wild land valued at 6/o per Acre: 10 s

 

 

 

p. 171: (County, State and School Tax, 1794)

 

 

 

County tax: 10-1/2 s

 

State tax: 2s, 9d

 

School tax: 2s, 9d

 

 

 

p. 172: “Beginning of the Highway & Bridge Tax”, 1794

 

 

 

Highway Tax: 4s

 

Bridge Tax: 2s, 5d

 

 

 

p. 179: “Inventory of the Town of Bath for the Year 1795 taken in the month of April”

 

 

 

No. of Polls: 1

 

No. of Acres of Wild Land: 50

 

No. of Horses & mares: 1

 

No. of cows: 1

 

(Total): 11 (s), 6 (d)

 

 

 

p. 183: (Highway, town and School Specie Tax, 1795)

 

 

 

Highway tax – 1795: 5 (s), 4(d)

 

Town wheat tax: 7 Cents

 

Town School Tax Specie: 28 Cents

 

 

 

p. 199: “The Inventory of the Town of Bath for the Year 1796 taken in the month of April of what was in Possession on the first Day of April”

 

 

 

No of Pooles: 1

 

No of Acres of Wilde Land: 50

 

No of Cowes: 1

 

No of Horses 2 Years old: 2

 

(Total): 13 (s), 6 (d)

 

 

 

p. 200: (Town Tax and Highway Tax, 1796)

 

 

 

Town Tax: 1 Dol. 22 Cents

 

Highway Tax: 81 Cents

 

 

 

 

These records indicate that William was living in Bath Town (see Figure 3, above) from 1793 to 1796 and apparently had 50 acres of “wild land.”

 

Figure 13. Image of the tax record for Bath Town for 179415, showing William Grimshaw (7th from bottom) owing County tax of 10-1/2s, State tax of 1s 9d, and School tax of 2s 9d.

 

 

    • Census Record in Coventry (Benton) Town, 1800

 

Coventry Town, located southeast of Bath Town (see Figure 3 above), was renamed Benton Town in 1840. The Census of 180016 found William Grimshaw and his family living in Coventry Town, with the following seven persons indicated:

 

 

3 free white males under 10

 

1 free white male of 10 and under 16

 

1 free white male of 26 and under 45

 

1 free white female of 10 and under 16

 

1 free white female of 26 and under 45

 

 

A copy of the census record entry is shown in Figure 14. William, his wife and two children that were counted in Lyman Town in 1790 appear to have been joined in 1800 by three sons under 10 years of age.

Figure 14. Image of the 1800 census book16 entry for William Grimshaw (16th entry) showing his residence in Coventry Town with a family of seven.

 

 

    • Published Marriage Intention of William Blair and Betsey Grimshaw, 1800

 

The town records of Haverhill Town17 (p. 464) include a record of publishment, dated October 5, 1800, for marriage of William’s (presumed) daughter, Betsey, to William Blair, both of Haverhill. An image of the record is shown in Figure 15.

Figure 15. Image of the Record of Publishment17 for marriage of William Blair and Betsey Grimshaw, dated October 5, 1800.

 

 

 

 

    • Inventory Record, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

After he moved to Haverhill Town, William was again subjected to inventorying and taxation, which was recorded in similar fashion to earlier actions in Bath Town. William was inventoried 18 at 1 “Polls” and 1 “Other Horses & Mares Wintered 5 Winters.” An image of the record18 (p. 524) is shown in Figure 16.

Figure 16. Image of 1801 Inventory Record18 for Haverhill Town, which included William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • Highway Tax Record, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

In 1801 William was dunned $1.50 for highway tax that was due to J. Howard. An image of the record19 (p. 526) is shown in Figure 17.

Figure 17. Image of 1801 Haverhill tax bill19 which included William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • County, Minister, School and Town Tax, Haverhill Town, 1801

 

Also in 1801 William was submitted to several additional taxes:

 

 

 

County 10c

 

Minister —

 

School 84c

 

Town 38c

 

 

 

An image of the record20 (p. 545) is shown in Figure 18.

Figure 18. Image of 1801 Inventory Record20 for Haverhill Town, which included William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • Highway Tax Record, Haverhill Town, 1802

 

In 1802, William was again taxed for highways, this time for $1.24. A copy of the record21 (p. 557) is shown in Figure 19. Note that his probable son-in-law (“William Blare”) is apparently shown in the adjacent record entry.

Figure 19. Image of 1801 Inventory Record21 for Haverhill Town, which included William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • Town, County, School and Minister Tax, Haverhill Town, 1802

 

The 1802 Haverhill tax record showed William owing taxes as follows:

 

 

 

Town Tax      46c

 

County Tax    10c

 

School Tax    77c

 

Minister Tax  80c

 

 

 

A copy of the tax record22 (p. 682) is shown in Figure 20

Figure 20. Image of 1801 Inventory Record22 for Haverhill Town, which included William Grimshaw.

 

 

    • Promissory Note, Samuel Chase to William Grimshaw, and Subsequent Judgment, August 1802

 

Bill O’Halloran located a record in the New Hampshire Records Administration and Archives office which is included on this webpage even though it is not part of the “collection” from the LDS Library. Thanks go (again) to Bill for making this record available. The e-mail that accompanied the images when Bill sent them is shown below by way of explanation….

 

 

August 21, 2001

 

Hi folks,

 

At long last, I have replaced my scanner, so I can share with you the information I obtained last month about William Grimshaw from the New Hampshire Records Administration and Archives in Concord, NH. We have long known that there was a record noted in the Grafton Co. Grantee index regarding William Grimshaw and Samuel Chase for 1802. However, no land transactions were listed at the Grafton Co. courthouse, and the entry I found there merely referred to the record being in the “Clerk’s Office”. After some sleuthing, I finally tracked the record to the NH Archives in Concord, where they keep all court proceedings prior to 1900. I was able to look at the original court records from 1802 and make copies. There are two documents of interest that I have scanned into three separate images.

 

What happened was that William Grimshaw lent Samuel Chase $20 in November 1800 and obtained a promissory note from him saying that it would be paid back by January 1802 plus interest. It appears that Mr. Chase didn’t pay on time, so William went to court. On 7 August 1802, he got a court order for the sheriff to attach the goods or estate of Samuel for the sum of $40, and falling that, to “take the body of said Samuel” and bring him before the court in Plymouth, which was scheduled to convene the second Tuesday of September 1802. It appears that Samuel didn’t fork over the cash, because on 25 August, the sheriff took Samuel into custody. On 19 September, the Court of Common Pleas awarded a writ in William’s favor to attach the property of Samuel Chase to satisfy the claim plus expenses, as per Docket 42, Grimshaw v. Chase.

 

I have a copy of the original promissory note (image 1 ), with the judgment written on it, along with a copy of the court order to the sheriff containing his notation about the arrest (images 2 and 3). The copies I have are somewhat hard to read, and I haven’t fully deciphered them yet. Each of the three jpeg images is between 1 and 1.5mb. I hesitate to compress the images further for fear of further reducing readability. I can try to send them to you one at a time to avoid overloading your mail servers. If this size is too big, let me know and I will compress the images further for you before sending.

 

Best regards, Bill

 

Image 1:

 

 

 

 

Image 2:

 

 

 

 

Image 3:

 

 

 

    • Land Purchase in Haverhill Town, 1803

 

William Grimshaw bought 15 acres of land from George Twiner for $150 in a transaction which was recorded in the Grafton County Land Records23 (v. 37, p. 283) dated December 23, 1803. This deed records reads as shown below; an image of the record is shown in Figure 21.

 

 

Know all Men by their presents that I Georger Twiner of Haverhill in the County of Grafton & State of New Hampshire Husbandman for & in Consideration of the sum of one hundred & fifty dollars to me in hand paid before the signing hereof by William Grimshaw of Haverhill aforesaid Cordwinder the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, have given, granted bargained & sold by these presents do give grand bargain sell convey and conform unto him the sd. William Grimshaw his heirs & assigns a certain parcel of land in Haverhill aforesaid bounded as follows viz – Beginning at a stake and stones upon the northerly side of the road leading through Haverhill to Coventry then runing Southerly as the Road goes to a stake and stones by land of Nathaniel runnels then Easterly by sd. Runnels and thirty Rods to a stake and stones upon land of Stephen Morse – thence by P Morses land to a white Ash tree – thence North 25 degrees East thirty two Rods to a white birch tree marked G.T.A. thence North{west}erly one hundred & three rods by land of Stephen Morse to a stake & stones by a larger red Oak down– thence Westerly to the bounds first mentioned fifteen acres more or less — . To have and to hold the above bargained premises with all the priviledges & appurtenances thereunto belonging to him the sd. William & his heirs & assigns forever to his & their own property Use & benefit & I the sd. George do for myself my heirs Executors & Administrators Covenant to and with sd. William his heirs Executors & Administrators that that at & until the signing hereof I am well seized of the premised in my own right at a good indefeasable Estate of Inheritance & that I have good right & lawfull Authority to bargain & sell the same in manner and form as is above written & that the said granted premises are free & clear of all incumbrances whatever & that I shall & will warrant & defend the same to him the sd. William against all lawfull claims & demands of all persons whatever – In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & Seal this twenty third day of December 1803 – .

 

 

 

Signed sealded & delivered George Twiner (seal)

 

In presence of

 

Zachariah Baron

 

William Dame

 

Grafton Co. December 24th 1803 then George Twiner aforesaid personally acknowledged the within written Instrument by him Signed & Sealed to be his free & Voluntary act & Deed

 

Attest – Moses Dors Jus. Pac –

 

Grafton Co Dec. 23rd 1803 Rec’d Records & Exam

 

Attest Sam Brooks (?)

 

 

This record shows that William was a cordwinder, presumably a misspelling of cordwainer, i.e., a shoemaker, as indicated prveiously. Also, it is interesting to note that George Twiner, who sold the land to William, appears also in the 1800 census record for Coventry Town (see Figure 9 above.)

Figure 21. Image of the land record23 showing purchase of 15 acres of land by William Grimshaw from George Twiner.

 

 

    • Petition to be Excused from Support of Minister John Smith, 1805

 

On March 12, 1805, William Grimshaw and 15 other worthies gave notice in the Haverhill Town Record24 (p. 365) that they should not have to be taxed for, or contribute to the salary of, Mr. John Smith, minister of the Town. The record is shown in Figure 22. One of the signers of the notice, George Twiner, appears to be the same individual that William bought land from in 1803 and was also in the 1800 Coventry census.

Figure 22. Notification of non-responsibility for taxes or salary for minister John Smith24

 

 

    • Land Sale in Haverhill Town, 1806

 

William sold the 15-acre parcel of land that he had acquired in 1803 for the same amount that he bought it for – $150 – in a transaction that was recorded in Grafton County land records25 (v. 42, p. 431) on February 25, 1806. The land was sold to Caleb Morse. The transaction reads as shown below, and an image of the transaction is shown in Figure 23.

 

 

Know all Men by their presents that I William Grimshaw of Haverhill in the County of Grafton & state of New Hampshire Cordwainer for and in Consideration of the sum of 1 hundred & fifty dollars to me in hand paid before the signing hereof by Caleb Morse of Haverhill aforesaid Yeoman the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge have given granted bargained & sold by these presents do give grant bargain sell Convey and Convey & Confirm unto him the said Caleb Morse his heirs and assigns a certain Parcel of land in Haverhill aforesaid bounded as follows viz beginning at a stake and stones upon the Northerly side of the road leading through Haverhill to Coventry thence runing southerly as the road goes to a stake and stones by land of Nathaniel Runnels then Easterly by said Runnels land Thirty Rods to a stake and stones upon land of Stephen Morse Thence by said Morses land to a White ash tree Thence North 25 degrees East Thirty two Rods to a white Birch tree marked G.T.A. Thence Northwesterly one hundred & three rods by land of Stephen Morse’s to a stake & stones by a larger red Oak Down thence westerly to the Bounds first mentioned fifteen acres more or less ——

 

To have and to hold the above bargained Premises with all the privileges & appurtenances thereunto belonging to him the said Caleb and his heirs and assigns forever to his & their own Proper use & benefit & I the sd. William do for myself my heirs Executors & administrators Covenant to and with the said Caleb his heirs executors & administrators that at & until the signing hereof I am well Seized of the premises in my own right as a good Indefeasible Estate of Inheritance & that I have good right & lawfull authority to bargain and sell the same in manner & form as above Written & that the said premises are free and Clear of all Incumbrances Whatever & that I shall & will warrant & Defend the same to him the said Caleb against all lawfull Claims & Demands of all persons whatever —- In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this 25th Day of Feby 1806

 

 

Once again William is shown as a cordwainer or shoemaker.

Figure 23. Image of the land record25 for the sale of the 15 acres in Haverhill Town by William Grimshaw to Caleb Morse

 

 

    • Census Record in Haverhill, 1810

 

Haverhill Town is located south of Bath Town and just across the Connecticut River from Vermont; the community of North Haverhill is the seat of Grafton County. William Grimshaw was recorded in the 1810 (Third) Census26 (p. 321) as living in Haverhill with his family, consisting of the following members: A copy of the record as shown in the census book is shown in Figure 24.

 

 

 

1 free white male of 10 and under 16

 

1 free white male of 45 and upwards, including heads of families

 

4 free white females of under 10

 

1 free white female of 26 and under 45

 

 

 

By the time of this census, William was over 45 (verifying that he was born no later than 1765), but his wife was still under 45. The older daughter, and three of the four sons, counted in the 1800 census, were not present for the 1810 census (two of the boys were thus still teenagers when they apparently left home.) And four young daughters have been added to the family, for an apparent total of nine children in the family – 5 daughters and 4 sons.

Figure 24. Image of the 1810 census book26 entry for William Grimshaw (5th entry), showing his residence in Haverhill Town with a family of seven.

 

 

    • Zephaniah (Son) Marriage Record, Haverhill Town, 1811

 

The town records of Haverhill Town27(p. 467, 469) include publishment of the intention of marriage (February 14, 1811) and the actual marriage (February 15, 1811) of William’s (presumed) son, Zephaniah, and Jerusha Hunter. Images of the two records are shown in Figure 25. This is the last record of Grimshaws in New Hampshire during the post-Revolutionary War era.

Figure 25. Images of the intention of marriage (a.) and actual marriage (b.) of Zephaniah Grimshaw and Jerusha Hunter27.

 

 

a. Marriage Intention Record

 

 

 

 

b. Marriage Record

 

 

 

 

    • Recapitulation of William Grimshaw’s Movements, and Family, in New Hampshire, 1789-1811

 

The records presented above on this webpage provide the basis for a rather detailed reconstruction of William’s movements, and the growth of his family, during the more than 20 years that he lived in New Hampshire. Sometime after his discharge from Hazen’s Regiment in June 1983, he apparently moved to Lyman Town (location shown in Figure 3, above) and bought 50 acres of land from Asa Parker (for 20 pounds) in the “original right” of Samuel Wilmot in early 1789. Three road petition records, from January to June 1789, reference roads that “strike” William’s land; in two of these records, William is one of the petitioners.

 

The first U.S. Census, in 1790, found William living in Lyman Town with his wife and two children, a daughter and a son under the age of 16. On November 10, 1790 William received Bounty Land Warrant No. 13129 for 100 acres in return for his Revolutionary War service. Then on March 15, 1791 William was voted as “tithing man” during a Lyman Town meeting. On November 10, 1791 a
school district was set up during another similar meeting that extended “as far as Wiam (sic) Grimshaw.” In January 1792 William sold the 50 acres in Lyman Town for 50 pounds, 2-1/2 times the amount he had paid for it two years earlier. The record of the land sale indicates that William was a cordwainer; i.e., a shoemaker. On March 13, 1792, William was voted as a “Saxon” during a Lyman Town meeting, and he took the oath of office on the same date.

 

Sometime later in 1792, or early 1793, William and his family apparently moved to Bath Town, just to the south of Lyman (see Figure 3), for a few years. William’s presence in Bath is indicated by property inventory and tax records for 1793, 1794, 1795 and 1796. His property included a poll (himself?), a cow, 1 or 2 horses and 50 acres of “wild land” (apparently different land than the 50 acres he sold in Lyman Town in 1792.) For this property he was assessed school, county, state, bridge, highway, and wheat taxes.

 

By 1800 William had moved to Coventry Town (renamed Benton Town in 1840) to the southeast of Bath Town (see Figure 3.) The second U.S. census of that year found him with his family, consisting of his wife, the son and daughter recorded in 1790 (now between 10 and 16 years of age,) and three additional sons, all under 10 years of age.

 

Sometime after the 1800 census, William and his family apparently moved to Haverhill Town, to the west of Coventry Town and the south of Bath Town (see Figure 3). In October 1800 Betsey Grimshaw and William Blair, both of Haverhill, were published for marriage according to Town records. Assuming that Betsey was William’s daughter (undoubtedly the oldest daughter, recorded in the 1790 and 1800 censuses), the family likely moved from Coventry to Haverhill Town sometime in 1800 after the census was taken. Betsey could not have been more than 16 years old at the time of her betrothal, as she was shown as less than 16 in the 1800 census.

 

An inventory record and four tax records document William’s presence in Haverhill Town in 1801 and 1802. Then in December 1803, William bought 15 acres of land in Haverhill Town, from George Twiner. This land purchase again showed William as a cordwainer (shoemaker.) On March 15, 1805 William and 15 others gave notice in the Haverhill Town meeting records that they should not be taxed for the salary of the Town minister, John Smith, because they were not of his denomination and did not attend his ministry or services. George Twiner, from whom William had bought land 15 months earlier, was one of the co-signers of the 1805 petition.In February 1806, William sold his 15-acre parcel in Haverhill to Caleb Morse for the same amount that he paid for it ($150) a little over two years earlier. Once again, William is shown in the land sale record as a cordwainer. Despite this land sale, William and his family are found in the third (1810) census still living in Haverhill. (Bill O’Halloran has pointed out a land record, not yet obtained from the Lyman Town Clerk’s Office, but known to be dated September 1802, may indicate that William owned two parcels of land in Haverhill. This could explain why he was still living there after selling the 15 acres to Caleb Morse.)

 

According to the 1810 census, the family consisted of William (now over 45), his wife (still under 45,) one son between age 10 and 16, and four new daughters (since the 1800 census.) The total number of William’s children, according to the censuses of 1790, 1800 and 1810, would then have been nine – 5 girls and 4 boys. The oldest daughter and 3 of the 4 sons (2 of them still teenagers) were not “picked up” in the 1810 census. As noted, Betsey was probably the oldest daughter and would probably have been married for 10 years, and Zephaniah, the presumed oldest son (second child) was soon to be married. In fact, the last known record of William and his family in New Hampshire consisted of the announcements, on consecutive days (February 14 and 15, 1811) of the betrothal and marriage of Zephaniah Grimshaw and Jerusha Hunter. The announcements appeared in the Haverhill Town records.

 

    • What Happened After 1811?

 

 

 

    • References

 

 

1E


2N


3U


4Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1773-1850. Grantee Index, E-K: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15790, January 30, 1952.


5Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1791-1793, Grafton County Records – Deeds, v. 15, p. 134-135: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15806, January 8, 1952.


6Lyman Town Clerk, 1789, Lyman Town Records, v. 1, 1785-1807 and 1804-1814: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15212, December 22, 1950, p. 17-18.


7The National Archives, 1965, Population Schedules of the First Census of the United States, 1790: National Archives Microfilm Publications, Microcopy No. 637, Roll 5, New Hampshire, Volumes 1 and 2, p. 51 (Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. ___, (date).

8National Archives Microfilm Publications no. M829, Roll 11 – US Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants Used in the US Military District of Ohio (Acts of 1788, 1803, and 1805.)

 

9Lyman Town Clerk, 1789, Lyman Town Records, v. 1, 1785-1807 and 1804-1814: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15212, December 22, 1950, p. 31.


10Lyman Town Clerk, 1789, Lyman Town Records, v. 1, 1785-1807 and 1804-1814: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15212, December 22, 1950, p. 36


11Lyman Town Clerk, 1789, Lyman Town Records, v. 1, 1785-1807 and 1804-1814: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15212, December 22, 1950, p. 39


12
Lyman Town Clerk, 1789, Lyman Town Records, v. 1, 1785-1807 and 1804-1814: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15212, December 22, 1950, p. 41

 

13Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1773-1850. Grantor Index, E-G: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15794, January 31, 1952.


14Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1791-1793, Grafton County Records – Deeds, v. 15, p. 135: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15806, January 8, 1952.


15Bath Town Clerk, 1789, Bath Town Records, State’s v. 1, 1780-1859: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15068, November 13, 1950, p. 133, 139, 167, 171, 172, 179, 183, 199, 200.


16The National Archives, 1960, Population Schedules of the Second Census of the United States, 1800: National Archives Microfilm Publications, Microcopy No. 32, Roll 20, New Hampshire, p. 669 (Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. ___, (date).


17Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p. 464.

18Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p. 524.

 

19Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p.526.

 

20Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p. 545.

 

21Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p. 557.

 

22Haverhill Town Clerk, 1800, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 2, 1772-1803: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15164, December 8, 1950, p. 682.

 

23Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1803-1805, Grafton County Records – Deeds, v. 37, p. 135: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15815, January 9, 1952, p. 283.

 

24Haverhill Town Clerk, 1811, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 3, 1785-1838: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15165, December 8, 1950, p. 365.

 

25Grafton County Register of Deeds, 1806, Grafton County Records – Deeds, v. 42, p. 431: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15806, January 8, 1952.

 

26The National Archives, 1960, Population Schedules of the Third Census of the United States, 1810: National Archives Microfilm Publications, Microcopy No. 252, Roll 23, New Hampshire, p. 321 (Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. ___, (date).

 

27Haverhill Town Clerk, 1811, Haverhill Town Records, State’s v. 3, 1785-1838: Salt Lake City, Utah, Latter Day Saints Family History Library, Microfilm No. 15165, December 8, 1950, p. 467, 469.

 

 

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Webpage posted February 2001, updated March 2001, May 2002. Updated April 2005 with creation of a separate companion webpage for the New Hampshire Records.