Caleb Grimshaw, Transatlantic Shipping Pioneer of the 1800s in Liverpool

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Caleb Grimshaw was descended from the Edward and Dorothy (Raner) line of Grimshaws near Leeds. He was married first to Sarah Thompson and second  to Hannah Ellis. Although his roots were near Leeds, he was in the shipping and immigrant business in Liverpool. The firm with his name, Caleb Grimshaw & Company, is described on a companion webpage. An immigrant ship bearing his name sank in 1849 with the loss of about 90 lives; it is similarly described on a companion webpage. Caleb Grimshaw died at the young age of 48 in 1847, well before his namesake ship sank.

Webpage Credits

Richard Walker’s Research into Caleb Grimshaw and His Company

Which Grimshaw Family Line Did Caleb Grimshaw Descend From?

Caleb Grimshaw’s Confirmation of Marriage Record

Updates on Caleb Grimshaw and Caleb Grimshaw & Company by Richard Walker

References

Webpage Credits

Thanks go to Richard Walker for providing most of the information on this webpage.

Richard Walker’s Research into Caleb Grimshaw and His Company

Richard Walker is related to Hannah Walker, wife of Charles T Grimshaw, fourth child of Caleb and Sarah (Thompson) Grimshaw. Charles and Hannah (Walker) Grimshaw are subjects of a companion webpage, which indicates that the Grimshaws and Thompsons were Quakers and were from near Leeds in Yorkshire. Thanks to Richard Walker for providing the information indicating the family connections of Caleb Grimshaw. Richard has also provided the following bibliographic information on Caleb Grimshaw.

Caleb Grimshaw.

 

Caleb Grimshaw was born about 1799 within Knaresbrough Quaker MM, probably in Rawden near Leeds, Yorkshire . A “certificate of removal” was issued by Knaresbrough Quaker Monthly Meeting of which Rawden Preparative meeting was a part, to Hardshaw West Quaker Monthly Meeting. This was a Liverpool Meeting. Named in the certificate of removal were Caleb Grimshaw, his first wife Sarah, (born Thompson of Rawden) and three children: 1) Edward who subsequently died 26 x 1826 (when the family address was Edge Lane, Liverpool ); 2) a daughter Elizabeth born 14 iii 1823; and 3) a son George born viii 1827.

The family’s arrival into Liverpool would therefore appear to be after August 1827. By 1829 the family lived at 1 Queen Street, Edge Hill, Liverpool. Two further children were born in Liverpool to Caleb and Sarah – a son Charles Thompson Grimshaw born 1 v 1830 and Ann Thompson Grimshaw born 16 x 1831. By 1832 the family home was at 6 Cambridge Street, Liverpool. Sarah Grimshaw, Caleb’s wife died 9 ii 1833 and the following year his daughter Ann Thompson died 6 iv 1834. In 1835 the family lived at 22 Slater Street, Liverpool. Between 1837 and 1841 their address was 5 Upper Stanhope Street, Liverpool.

Caleb married a second time, on 4 ii 1841 to Hannah, (surname unknown) and in April 1841 they were living at Windsor, Toxteth Park, Liverpool. Elizabeth (age 16) and George (14) are shown as the children present, also an Anne Smith (22) and a female servant. The birth of Sarah Margaret their daughter is recorded for 7 xii 1842. In this year their address was “Bootle Villas”, 50 Derby Road, Bootle cum Linacre. This is north of Liverpool and in a very up and coming area overlooking the entrance to the river Mersey, their neighbours being other ships captains, merchants and captains of industry at that time. From a map of that date it is clear that Caleb would have a clear view from his house of his ships passing out to sea and also those entering port.

Caleb died 1 ii 1847 and was buried two days later at the Quaker burial ground, Hunter Street, Liverpool. His death was sudden and a coroner’s verdict was required before burial. “Hydrothoria” and “lived 15minutes” was recorded by John Heyes, Coroner. His age was given as 48 years so his date of birth would have been about 1799.

In April 1851 Hannah Grimshaw was still living at Bootle Villas and so was a George Grimshaw, ships broker. This address, (G. Grimshaw and Co., Bootle Villas) was George’s business address but his private address was 2 Mersey View, Birkenhead. It is not known for certain at this time of writing if George was a relative.

Charles Thompson Grimshaw married Hannah Walker, daughter of John and Mary (Thompson) Walker of Rawden at Rawden Quaker Meeting House on 7 xi 1855. A certificate for his “removal” to Rawden was written by Hardshaw West in December 1856. This would suggest that the couple lived in Liverpool following the marriage for a year and that they decided to live in Rawden.

Hannah, age 77, Caleb’s second wife was living in April 1881 at 10 Claremont Road , Birkdale, a part of Southport . (This house still exists, June 2005). The above Census Return showed her as a “Lodging House Keeper” with a servant Ann Thompson age 73, born at Geld near York. Hannah Grimshaw died 18/19 ii 1887 aged 83 and was interned from the above address in Southport Public Cemetery . From the above it would suggest Hannah Grimshaw was born about 1804. There are two dates given in two different documents for her death.

Richard also provided the following information on Caleb Grimshaw’s company:

Caleb Grimshaw and Co.

 

In 1827 William Fitzhugh, general agent, had a “Passenger Office for emigrants” at 18 Brook Square, Liverpool. By 1832 Caleb Grimshaw was in partnership with William Sudlow Fitzhugh, under the company name of Fitzhugh and Grimshaw, merchants. Their business address was 10 Goree Piazzas, Liverpool. This was on the main Liverpool waterfront. This partnership and business continued until 1841.

By 1842 it was Caleb Grimshaw and Co, merchants, 10 Goree Piazzas, Liverpool . The companies “Emigration Office” was at 29 Waterloo Road opposite Waterloo Dock where their vessels moored. The firm of Caleb Grimshaw and Co, Merchants, passenger brokers and ship owners is listed in the Liverpool directories up to 1872. I have not looked further.

In 1817 five Quakers in New York, Isaac Wright and his son, Francis Thompson, Benjamin Marshall and Jeremiah Thompson began the Black ball line and adverts appeared in the Liverpool Mercury. In Liverpool at this date Messer’s Cropper, Benson, Rathbone and Hodgkinson became their agents. Cropper and Benson were Quakers and members of Hardshaw West Meeting as was Caleb Grimshaw.

There was a very strong Quaker presence in the arrangement, not only five Quakers in New York but the two Thompson’s in New York were both born in Rawden, Yorkshire, and they both had families who built woollen mills in Rawden. Caleb’s son Charles married Hannah Walker of Rawden, her father John, (wife Mary, formally Thompson of Rawden) too had a woollen mill there and this writer has some twenty pages of his business records between 1818 and 1826. Many of these pages document payment costs, woollen cargo, shipping costs and boats names including the Thompson, Benson, Cropper names etc.

A third group of names is also present in this transatlantic venture, that of Thomas Walker (1763-1842) of Gildersome, Leeds and his first wife Elizabeth Jackson (1767-1800) who went in 1793 to New York. Four Walker children were born there. From a diary of 1809 Thomas’s nephew wrote, “My uncle Thomas Walker the youngest child of the family carried forward the business, (cloth manufacturer) on his own and his mothers account”. “Thomas was a shipowner”. Thomas took with him in 1793 his nephew, Joseph Walker (1781-1835) of Darley, son of Robert and Rachel (Spence) Walker.

Family letters by Elizabeth Hannah Hoyland (1761-1827), born New York, who became in 1802 Thomas’s second wife state that he, “Thomas Walker retired in 1809 a well to do merchant in New York in the dry goods import business.” His nephew Joseph carried on the business until 1828/29 when he came back to Darley, Yorkshire. He died in 1835 and left estates worth £48,000.

In 1842 Samuel Thompson began his New York to Liverpool line for passengers, Caleb Grimshaw became his Liverpool representative, Caleb also secured freight for the Thompson packet ships. They sailed under the Grimshaw “New Line” flag. Caleb Grimshaw & Co were agents for:

·
Jerimiah Thompson’s Black Ball line.

·
Rathbone & Cropper’s Black Ball
line.

·
Taylor & Merrill line, 1842.

·
Samuel Thompson’s line, 1842.

·
Empire Line, 1844.

·
Slater’s Liverpool line 1846.

·
Black Star line with John Taylor Crook
1847.

·
And others.        

Amongst the many transatlantic sailing boats these people owned, some were named after their founders, examples being “James Cropper”, “William Thompson”, “Caleb Grimshaw” “Jeremiah Thompson” and “Joseph Walker”. The names of Grimshaw, Thompson and Walker, and the towns of New York, Liverpool and Rawden are all inextricably linked not only with Quakerism but also a venture which in the early 1800s was new to the World and its trading methods between two Continents. All named families had marriages between them and carried on their surnames as “given names.

Sources:

·        Quaker archive records, Friends House, London
.

·
Yorkshire Quaker records, Uni of Leeds. Yorks
.

·
Liverpool Maritime Archives.

·
Cropper & Benson business papers.

·
Liverpool Records office. (1841, ’51,’ 61, ’71 and 1881 Census Returns.)

·
Gores Street & trade directories.

·
Hardshaw West Quaker records.

·
Queens of the Western Oceans. C Cutler

·
Square riggers on Schedule R. Albion

·
Walker family papers, letters, wills, diaries etc.

There were a number of Walkers in New York connected with this venture and many had children, grandchildren and great grandchildren who “on paper” I have traced. I would welcome correspondence with anyone who can connect with this group. A family tree, “with proof” back to William Walker born 1468 in Liversedge township, parish of Birstall, West Yorkshire, England awaits. 

Richard B Walker, Formby, England June 2005     therbwalker@talktalk.net

Caleb Grimshaw’s Confirmation of Marriage Record

Richard has provided the following image of the record of Caleb Grimshaw’s marriage to his second wife, Hannah Ellis, in 1841 as described above (surname subsequently found by Richard).

Conformation of Marriage of Caleb Grimshaw to Hannah Ellis 4th day 2nd month 1841 at Ackworth Friend’s Meeting House.

 

“Hardshaw West monthly Meeting held at Liverpool 1st month 28th day 1841” 

“Minute 10th
The following minute has been received from Pontefract Monthly Meeting, viz “The Monthly Meeting of Hardshaw West is hereby informed that the marriage between Caleb Grinshaw and Hannah Ellis was solemnized at Friends Meeting House Ackworth in the County of York the 4th day of 2nd month 1841. Signed in and on behalf of Pontefract Monthly Meeting held at Barnsley this 15th day of 3rd month 1841. Signed Geo. Benning clerk this time.”

Water and fire ravaged as you’ll see, but enhanced digitally to the best state available.

Richard B Walker. Formby. 2006.

Richard has conducted extensive research in the Quaker records in Liverpool and provided the following additional information in his e-mail:

The Liverpool Quaker Meeting was known as Hardshaw West. Some years ago a fire ravaged the building and got to the records (1672-1960). The remains had been deposited in the Liverpool City archives and no one was allowed to view them. As a Quaker researcher I got permission to view them from Friend’s House, London but only after promising to digitally photo some of the most valuable records. I now have some 2,500 pages imaged.

Updates on Caleb Grimshaw and Caleb Grimshaw & Company by Richard Walker

Thanks go to Richard for updating the records provided above with a submittal received in September 2008, which is provided below.

 

Caleb Grimshaw. 1801 – 1847.

Caleb Grimshaw was born the 19th of August 1801, the sixth of seven children of Leonard Grimshaw (1767-1819) of Bossell near York and his wife Elizabeth (Hall) who married 4-6-1795. This was not a Quaker family at the time of Caleb’s birth though he became one before his first marriage.

Caleb and his first wife Sarah (born Thompson of Rawden) were married 10th March 1824.

A “certificate of removal” was issued by Knaresborough Monthly Meeting of which Rawden Preparative Meeting was a part, to Hardshaw West Monthly Meeting, Liverpool.

Named in the certificate of removal of introduction and acceptance were:-

Caleb Grimshaw, his wife Sarah and their three children.

1). Edward who subsequently died 26 x 1826 (when the family address was Edge Lane, Liverpool),

2). A daughter Elizabeth born 14 iii 1823.

3). A son George born viii 1827.

The families’ arrival into Liverpool would therefore appear to be after August 1827. From Kelly’s street directory of Liverpool we see that in 1829 the family lived at 1 Queen Street, Edge Hill, Liverpool.

Two further children were born in Liverpool to Caleb and Sarah.

4). Charles Thompson Grimshaw born 1 v 1830.

and

5). Ann Thompson Grimshaw born 16 x 1831.

By 1832 the family home was at 6 Cambridge Street, Liverpool.

Sarah Grimshaw, Caleb’s wife died 9 ii 1833 and the following year his daughter Ann Thompson Grimshaw died 6 iv 1834. In 1835 the family lived at 22 Slater Street, Liverpool. Between 1837 and 1841 their address was 5 Upper Stanhope Street, Liverpool.

Caleb married a second time, on 4 ii 1841 to Hannah Ellis at Friends Meeting House, Ackworth, Yorkshire. Hannah Ellis was born 15.10.1803 the first child of twelve to George Ellis (1780-1857) of Morley, Yorks and Sarah Lister. Sarah was not a Quaker and as their marriage was held at Batley Church the couple were disowned, all children were christened at New Chapel, Independent, Morley, Yorks. Hannah, herself at some stage became a Quaker before marrying Caleb.

In the April 1841 C. R. Caleb and Hannah were shown as living at Stanhope Street, (or Windsor, Toxteth Park), Liverpool.

Caleb age 40 & Hannah his wife age 38, Elizabeth 16 and George 14 also Anne Smith 22 a female servant.

The birth of Sarah Hannah their daughter is recorded for 7 xii 1842. In this year their address was “Bootle Villas”, 50 Derby Road, Bootle cum Linacre. This is north of Liverpool and in a very up and coming area, their neighbours being other ships captains, merchants and captains of industry. Sarah attended the Quaker boarding school of Ackworth between 1853 and 1855.

Caleb died 1 ii 1847 and was buried two days later at the Quaker burial ground, Hunter Street, Liverpool. His death was sudden and a coroner’s verdict was required before burial. “Hydrothoria” and “lived 15 minutes” was recorded by John Heyes, Coroner. His age was given as 48 years so his date of birth would have been about 1799.

By 1848 George Ellis (12 December 1821), one of Hannah’s brothers had moved from Batley and was living at 2 Vulcan Street, Liverpool. His business, timber merchant and joiner, was conducted from 22 Vandries Street, Liverpool. Later he had a “steam and saw mill” and lived at Lower Mersey View, North Shore, and by the 1881 C R at Sea Bank House, New Chester Road, Tranmere, Cheshire. This family do not feature in the Quaker records.

In The Friend, Volume 5 (1847) p.119 there is a note of the marriage at Rawden M.M. of Elizabeth Grimshaw of Bootle, daughter of Caleb, on 16.5.1849 to Henry Wilson of Ackworth, Yorkshire. Henry was born 24.8.1822 to William & Hannah Wilson of Oldham, Marsden MM.

“Henry started attending the Quaker boarding school of Ackworth 24.10.1832 and left 22.10.1836. Went to Bonn University to study. He was a fellow student with Prince Albert; years afterwards, when the Prince was passing Ackworth, Henry Wilson went to meet him and renew their old college acquaintance. Between 1837 and 1843 he became an apprentice teacher at Ackworth and between 1848 and 1855 was Master on Duty”.

From an Ackworth Old Scholars’ association publication the following was written:-

“At once he made his mark upon the School by initiating a policy full of wise reasonableness, by exercising a generous confidence in the good sense and good feeling of the boys, by freely participating in their little interests, by skilfully turning their energies into safe channels, so the loyalty to the School and to what was right and true rapidly increased. He greatly extended and enriched the Boys’ Library, in order to make it a serviceable lever in the elevation of the tastes of the children. He revived and remodeled the Society of Arts, of which he was a distinguished boy member when it was founded in 1836, till it became a leading power of culture. So great was the diligence of its members that 705 drawings were on exhibition as the work of three months, while as yet drawing was not a school lesson. (Henry Thompson’s History)”

In the 1851 Liverpool Street Directory Hannah Grimshaw was recorded as still living at Bootle Villas and so was a son George Grimshaw, ships broker. This address, (G. Grimshaw and Co) was George’s business address but his private address was 2 Mersey View, Birkenhead.

In the CR for April 1851 Hannah Grinshaw, widow, age 47 is found visiting Joseph & Elizabeth Lowe (Ellis) of 41 Market Street, Great Bolton, Lancashire. Elizabeth was Hannah’s sister, also visiting was a second sister Ann Ellis, unmarried age 24 an “assistant confectioner”.

Charles Thompson Grimshaw married Hannah Walker, daughter of John and Mary (Thompson) Walker of Rawden at Rawden Quaker Meeting House on 7 xi 1855. A certificate for his “removal” to Rawden was written by Hardshaw West in December 1856. This would suggest that the couple lived in Liverpool following the marriage for a year and that they decided to live in Rawden.

In the CR for April 1861 Hannah Grimshaw, age 57 was at Brent Street, South Brent, Somerset visiting her cousin Ellis Shackleton, widow, age 36, corn miller with a three year old daughter Fanny. Ellis Shackleton was a Quaker, son of Hannah’s Aunt Elizabeth Ellis who married Joseph Shackleton.

The CR for April 1861 shows:-

118 Oxton Road, Birkenhead, Cheshire.

George Grimshaw Head, Married Age 33. Ship & Passenger Broker. Born Rawdon. Yks

Isabella Grimshaw, wife, Married 32 . Born Cookstown,Co. Tyrone, Ireland.

Jane Ralston, Ser, Unm, 23, house servant, Born Gateshead, Scotland.

Hardshaw West Quaker records record the death of George Grimshaw of Birkenhead (Merchant) on 26-3-1863 age 36 years, and his burial at Liscard Quaker Burial ground.

In the April 1871 CR Hannah Grimshaw, age 66, annuitant is shown living at Belmont Street, North Meols, Southport, staying with her were George 12 and Ann E. Ellis 9, nephew & niece bother listed as scholars and born in Liverpool.

Hannah, age 77, Caleb’s second wife was living in April 1881 at 10 Claremont Road, Birkdale, Southport. (This house still exists, June 2005). This Census Return showed her as a “Lodging House Keeper” born at Gildersome, Yorkshire with a servant Ann Thompson age 73.

Hannah Grimshaw died 18/19 ii 1887 aged 83 and was interned from the above address in Southport Public Cemetery. The stone reads:-

“In loving memory of Hannah Grimshaw who died February 19th 1897 aged 83 years. Also Ann Gordon sister of the above born at Belroyd, Gildersome October 16th 1826.”

Ann was Hannah’s youngest sister, and from the CR of 1881 was a widow living at 21 Linaker Street, Southport.

The grave stone was recently found and photographed by this writer and from enquiries the grave was paid for by the Milner family of Sheffield.

“Bootle Villas” on Derby Road was demolished sometime before 1900 and a road through the land built thereafter. This road exist to-day as Grimshaw Street, Bootle.

 

Richard Walker’s update for Caleb Grimshaw and Company appears below:

 

Caleb Grimshaw and Co.

In 1827 William S. Fitzhugh, general agent, had a “Passenger Office for emigrants” at 18 Brook Square, Liverpool.

By 1832 Caleb Grimshaw was in partnership with William Sudlow Fitzhugh, under the title of Fitzhugh and Grimshaw, merchants. Their business address was 10 Goree Piazzas, Liverpool. This was on the main Liverpool waterfront. This partnership and business continued until 1841.

By 1842 it was Caleb Grimshaw and Co, merchants, 10 Goree Piazzas, Liverpool.

The companies “Emigration Office” was at 29 Waterloo Road opposite Waterloo Dock where their vessels moored.

The firm of Caleb Grimshaw and Co, Merchants, passenger brokers and ship owners is listed in the Liverpool directories up to 1872. I have not looked further.

In 1817 five Quakers in New York, Isaac Wright and his son, Francis Thompson, Benjamin Marshall and Jeremiah Thompson, began the Black Ball Line and adverts appeared in the Liverpool Mercury.

In Liverpool at this stage Messer’s Cropper, Benson, Rathbone and Hodgkinson became their agents. Cropper and Benson were Quakers and members of Hardshaw West Meeting as was Caleb Grimshaw.

There was a very strong Quaker presence in the arrangement, not only five Quakers in New York but the two Thompson’s in New York were both born in Rawden, Yorkshire, and they both had families who built woollen mills in Rawden. Caleb’s son Charles married Hannah Walker of Rawden, her father John, (wife Mary, formally Thompson of Rawden) too had a woollen mill there and this writer has some twenty pages of his original business records between 1818 and 1826. Many of these pages document payment costs, woollen cargo, shipping costs and boats names including the Walker, Thompson, Benson, Cropper names.

A third group of names is also present in this transatlantic venture, that of Thomas Walker (1763-1842) of Gildersome, Leeds and his first wife Elizabeth Jackson (1767-1800) who went with a “Certificate of removal” from Gildersome Friends 1793 to New York. Four Walker children were born there. From a diary of 1809 Thomas’s nephew wrote, “My uncle Thomas Walker the youngest child of the family carried forward the business, (cloth manufacturer) on his own and his mothers account”. Thomas took with him in 1793 his nephew, Joseph Walker (1781-1835) of Darley son of Robert and Rachel (Spence) Walker.

Family letters by Elizabeth Hannah Hoyland (1761-1827), born New York, who became in 1802 Thomas’s second wife state that he, “Thomas Walker retired in 1809 a well to do merchant in New York in the dry goods import business” His nephew Joseph carried on the business until 1828/29 when he came back to Darley, Yorkshire. He died in 1835 and left estates worth £48,000.

In 1842 Samuel Thompson began his New York to Liverpool line for passengers, Caleb Grimshaw became his Liverpool representative, Caleb also secured freight for the Thompson packet ships. They sailed under the Grimshaw “New Line” flag.

Caleb Grimshaw & co were agents for;-

Jerimiah Thompson’s Black Ball line.

Rathbone & Cropper’s Black Ball line.

Taylor & Merrill line, 1842.

Samuel Thompson’s line, 1842.

Empire Line, 1844.

Slater’s Liverpool line 1846.

Black Star line with John Taylor Crook 1847.

And others.

Amongst the many transatlantic sailing boats these people owned, some were named after their founders, examples being “James Cropper”, “William Thompson”, “Caleb Grimshaw” “Jeremiah Thompson” and “Joseph Walker”.

This writer has an envelope dated 17th December 1872 posted to:-

Josiah Thompson,

“C. Grimshaw House”,

Chapel Street,

Liverpool.

The name of Caleb Grimshaw lived on many years after his death!

The surnames names of Thompson and Walker and later Grimshaw, and the towns of New York, Liverpool and Rawden are all linked not only with Quakerism but also a venture which in the early 1800s was new to the World and the trading methods between England and the USA. All three named families had marriages between them and also carried on their surnames as “given names”.

Sources;-

Quaker archive records, Friends House, London.

Yorkshire Quaker records, Uni of Leeds. Yorks.

Liverpool Maritime Archives.

Cropper & Benson business papers.

Liverpool Records office. (1841, ’51,’ 61, ’71 and 1881 Census Returns.)

Gores Street & trade directories.

Hardshaw West Quaker records.

Queens of the Western Oceans. C Cutler

Square riggers on Schedule R. Albion

Walker family papers, letters, wills, diaries etc

“Superintendents, Teachers and Principle Officers of Ackworth School from 1779 to 1894”. Compiled by Joseph Spence Hodgson. 1895.

Southport Cemetery Records.

Hardshaw West Monthly Meeting records.

Richard B. Walker

Formby, Liverpool

June 2005

Revised Sept. 2008.

 

Which Grimshaw Family Line Did Caleb Grimshaw Descend From?

Caleb Grimshaw was descended from the “Yorkshire” line of Grimshaws, whose earliest known ancestors are Edward and Dorothy (Raner) Grimshaw. Examination of the extensive descendant chart on Edward and Dorothy’s webpage shows that there is a line including three Caleb Grimshaws as follows:


Edward Grimshaw (About 1559 – 22 Jun 1635) & Dorotye Raner

|–Abraham Grimshaw (1603 – 1670) & Sarah ( – 21 Sep 1695)

 

|–|–JeremyJeremiah Grimshaw* (21 Jul 1653 – 12 Aug 1721) & Mary Stockton ( – 6 Jan 1692/1693)

|–|–|–Joshua Grimshaw (12 Apr 1687 – 8 Jan 1764) & Jane Oddy (1686 – 1771)

|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (20 May 1688 – 1751) & Esther Hudson

|–|–|–|–William Grimshaw (24 Nov 1713 – 6 Oct 1714)

|–|–|–|–Mercy Grimshaw (28 Sep 1715 – )

|–|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (3 Aug 1718 – 3 Jun 1794) & Ruth

|–|–|–|–|–Betty Grimshaw (4 Sep 1754 – )

|–|–|–|–|–John Grimshaw (29 Mar 1756 – )

|–|–|–|–|–Jeremiah Grimshaw (6 Nov 1759 – )

|–|–|–|–|–Leonard Grimshaw & Eliza

|–|–|–|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (1799 – 1847) & Sarah Thompson

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Elizabeth Grimshaw (14 Mar 1825 – )

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–George Grimshaw (12 Aug 1827 – )

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Edward Grimshaw (22 May 1828 – 25 Oct 1828)

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Charles T Grimshaw (About 1831 – ) & Hannah Walker

|–|–|–|–|–Jonathan Grimshaw (1770 – 20 Jun 1798) & Hannah Burley

|–|–|–|–|–|–Mary Grimshaw (17 Jun 1792 – 4 Feb 1842)

|–|–|–|–|–|–John Grimshaw (22 Nov 1793 – 23 Nov 1794)

|–|–|–|–|–|–Elizabeth Grimshaw (7 Feb 1795 – ) & Isaac Clarke

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Lucy Clarke

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Arthur Clarke

|–|–|–|–|–|–Hannah Grimshaw (16 May 1796 – 29 May 1796)

|–|–|–|–|–|–William Grimshaw (1 Dec 1797 – )

|–|–|–|–Jeremiah Grimshaw (30 May 1721 – )


|–|–JeremyJeremiah Grimshaw* (21 Jul 1653 – 12 Aug 1721) & Sarah Overend (- 16 May 1699)

|–|–JeremyJeremiah Grimshaw* (21 Jul 1653 – 12 Aug 1721) & Rebecca Jowett (- 12 Dec 1736)

 

The Caleb Grimshaw described on this webpage is shown in italics; he was born in 1799, married Sarah Thompson, and died in 1847. Since the ship was launched in 1847, it seems likely that the ship was named after Caleb Grimshaw posthumously. Thanks to Richard Walker for providing the information indicating the likely family connections of Caleb Grimshaw.

Based on the above information from Richard Walker, the following expansions of Caleb’s family can be constructed:


Edward Grimshaw (About 1559 – 22 Jun 1635) & Dorotye Raner

|–Abraham Grimshaw (1603 – 1670) & Sarah ( – 21 Sep 1695)

 

|–|–JeremyJeremiah Grimshaw* (21 Jul 1653 – 12 Aug 1721) & Mary Stockton (- 6 Jan 1692/1693)

|–|–|–Joshua Grimshaw (12 Apr 1687 – 8 Jan 1764) & Jane Oddy (1686 – 1771)

|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (20 May 1688 – 1751) & Esther Hudson

|–|–|–|–William Grimshaw (24 Nov 1713 – 6 Oct 1714)

|–|–|–|–Mercy Grimshaw (28 Sep 1715 – )

|–|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (3 Aug 1718 – 3 Jun 1794) & Ruth

|–|–|–|–|–Betty Grimshaw (4 Sep 1754 – )

|–|–|–|–|–John Grimshaw (29 Mar 1756 – )

|–|–|–|–|–Jeremiah Grimshaw (6 Nov 1759 – )

|–|–|–|–|–Leonard Grimshaw (1767 – 1819) & Elizabeth Hall. Married 4 Jun 1795.

|–|–|–|–|–|–Five unknown children

|–|–|–|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (19 Aug 1801 – 1 Feb 1847) & Sarah Thompson (? – 2 Feb 1833). Married 10 Mar 1824.

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Elizabeth Grimshaw (14 Mar or May 1825 – ) & Henry Wilson (24 Aug 1822 – ?). Married 16 May 1849.

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–George Grimshaw (12 Aug 1827 – 26 Mar 1863) & Isabella

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Edward Grimshaw (22 May 1828 – 25 Oct 1828 or 26 Oct 1826?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Charles Thompson Grimshaw (1 May 1830 – ?) & Hannah Walker. Married 7 Nov 1855.

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Ann Grimshaw (26 Oct 1831 –  6 Apr 1834)

|–|–|–|–|–|–Caleb Grimshaw (19 Aug 1801 – 1 Feb 1847) & Hannah Ellis (15 Oct 1803 – 18/19 Feb 1887). Married 4 Feb 1841.

|–|–|–|–|–|–|–Sarah Hanna Grimshaw (7 Dec 1842 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–Seventh unknown child

|–|–|–|–|–Jonathan Grimshaw (1770 – 20 Jun 1798) & Hannah Burley

 

References

1Author

2Author

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Webpage posted June 2005. Upgraded April 2006 with addition of marriage record and related information. Upgraded October 2008 with addition of updates of Richard Walker’s information and preparation of expanded descendant chart.