Arthur H. Grimshaw

Regimental Commander for the Union Side in the American Civil War


Col. Grimshaw

Home Page

Arthur Harper Grimshaw was the youngest son of William Grimshaw, the noted historical author, and his first wife, Harriet Elizabeth Milligan. During the American Civil War, Arthur apparently raised “his own” regiment for the Union side in Delaware and commanded it through the course of the war.

Webpage Credit


Photos of A.H. Grimshaw with Officers
 
Obituary Records
Documentation of Civil War Service in the Official Record

Photo and Signature

Delaware Civil War Society Background Information

Arthur Harper’s Last Will and Testament

References

Webpage Credit

Thanks to Hilary Tulloch for providing family history records that include obituaries for Arthur Grimshaw.

Photos of A.H. Grimshaw with Officers

The photo in Figure 1 was found on the internet on the “Bits of Blue and Gray: an American Civil War Notebook” website. The website address is as follows:

http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/DE4th.htm

Credit was given on the webpage as follows: “Photo used with permission of the Historical Society of Delaware.”

Figure 1. Field and Staff Officers of the Fourth Delaware Regiment Infantry Volunteers, with Col. A.H. Grimshaw in center. The identities of the seven officers are given below the photo.

Standing, left to right: Adj. Lt. – William H. Cloward; Lt. Col. Charles E. LaMotte; Surgeon – Major D.S. Hopkins

Seated, left to right: Major Moses B. Gist; Commander – Col. Arthur H. Grimshaw; Quarter Master – Lt. John J. Toner; Surgeon – Lt. Linton Smith

This website also includes a portrait photo of Col. Arthur Grimshaw, which is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Portrait photo of Col. Arthur Grimshaw from the “Bits of Blue and Grey” website.

Obituary Records

According to Hilary Tulloch’s records, Arthur was “a lecturer prior to the war in the Hannah More Academy for young ladies, established by his sisters, the Misses Charlotte and Isabella Grimshaw, at the corner of Eighth and West Streets, in Philadelphia, in 1853.” Arthur married Elizabeth A. Bailey on April 10, 1850, but they left no descendants. Hilary’s records also include two obituaries for Arthur, which are shown below (citations have not yet been identified).

 

DEATH OF COLONEL GRIMSHAW.

COMMANDER OF THE FOURTH DELAWARE REGIMENT DIED YESTERDAY.

Colonel Arthur Harper Grimshaw, M.D., died at his residence, 827 Washington Street, this city, at 4.30 o’clock yesterday afternoon. He had been sick for several months with a complication of diseases, and was under the care of Doctors Louis P. Bush, John P. Wales and Evan C. Shortlidge. Only the members of his family were with him at the time of his death.

Colonel A.H. Grimshaw was born in Philadelphia, January 16, 1824. He was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania of the class of 1845. After his graduation he became assistant resident physician of the Philadelphia Dispensary and physician to the Friends’ Orphan Asylum for Colored Children, and also served as resident physician of the Philadelphia almshouse.

He came to Delaware in 1847 and began the practice of medicine at DuPont’s banks. In January, 1849, he removed to this city and entered at once on a large and successful practice of his profession, in which he continued – afterward adding to it a drug business on Market street above Sixth – until 1861 when he was appointed postmaster of this city by President Abraham Lincoln. He was removed from that office in 1865 by President Johnson.

On June 7, 1862, he was commissioned colonel of volunteers, and appointed mustering officer to recruit the Fourth Regiment Delaware Volunteer Infantry for service in the war of the rebellion. The history of this regiment under Colonel Grimshaw’s command is well known as that of one of the most gallant regiments in the Army of the Potomac. It was noted for the devotion of the commander to the interest and care of his men and their willing and daring services under his leadership. One of the first movements of the regiment was to Gloucester Point, Va., in the latter part of 1862, where it remained in camp for several months. One of the first efforts of Colonel Grimshaw was to put a stop to the killing of men on the picket line by the resident rebels of that vicinity. This practice was a dishonorable method of warfare disapproved by the colonel, and to stop it he gathered all the horses in the regiment and with a mounted guard visited all the farmhouses in the vicinity of the camp and told the people that if one of his men was killed on the picket line he would burn every building near the encampment. It is a notable fact that he stopped the shooting of pickets on his line and did not lose a man in that way. He not only cared for his men in this way, but saw to it that they did not want for food and clothing when it was possible to avoid it, and they knew without asking that he was always doing all that could be done to provide for them. He was also generous with his money and his purse was always open to the demands of his friends. He ranked high as a good and brave soldier. His abilities were soon recognized and he was made a brigade commander, serving in that position during the most of his term of service. His command took a chief part in the battle of Chapel House, Va., and distinguished itself at the battle of Cold Harbor. It was also in the attack on Petersburg, Va., and many others of importance. In the attack on Petersburg Colonel Grimshaw was wounded twice. He was wounded in the shoulder by a piece of a shell, and was shot through the right arm by a rifle ball.

In civil life Colonel Grimshaw served three terms as a member of City Council; was a member of the Board of Public Education for nearly twenty years and was at one time president of the board. He succeeded the Hon. Judge Hall as superintendent of common schools of New Wales county, and was a member of the Board of Health.

He was always deeply interested in educational matters and was lecturer in the Hannah More Academy for young ladies, established by his sisters, the Misses Charlotte and Isabella Grimshaw, at the corner of Eighth and West Streets, in this city, in 1853. He was also interested in the forming of a working-men’s institute in this city at the close of the war, and lectured before it on many interesting topics.

He was a natural educator. His father was the author of a number of school books, among which was a history of the United States. A number of his books were at one time in use in the schools of New Castle county. Colonel Grimshaw was the author of two prize essays – one on the ‘Use of Tobacco’, and the other on ‘Juvenile Delinquencies’, which were widely read. He also re-wrote and published the history of the United States, originally written by his father.

As a physician he had few superiors. In the practice of his profession he was brave and unselfish. He was as untiring in the care of his patients as he was loyal in the service of his country. He was in this regard the friend of the poor as he was the friend of his comrades-in-arms. His gratuitous services as a physician will long be remembered by those who were fortunate enough to share his care and feel his kindly ministrations.

Colonel Grimshaw was a member of the Delaware Medical Society, of the Historical Society of Delaware and of the Grand Army of the Republic. Of the latter he was the first department commander. He was a member of Grant Post.

He leaves no family. His wife was the daughter of Joseph T. Bailey of this city. She died about seven years ago. The date of his funeral has not been fixed, and will not be until his brother William A. Grimshaw of Pittsfield, Ill., either has been heard from or arrives in this city. It will probably be on Wednesday.

A meeting of the Fourth Delaware Association has been called at the parlour of DuPont Post, No.2, G.A.R. for 8 o’clock this evening, to make arrangements for attending the funeral.

 

Copied from a newspaper extract lent me by Dr Robert Grimshaw formerly U.S. America now of Dresden. TWG (Thomas Wrigley Grimshaw) Dec 1899:

 

 

Dr A.H. GRIMSHAW, who died yesterday afternoon, was one of those men whose habitual frankness and bluntness of manner serve as spice for a gentle and loving nature within. If the truth was known it would probably be found that in almost all such cases of outward roughness and inward kindness the outward manner was originally due to constitutional timidity and tenderness. Such men assume a fierce manner in order to reassure themselves; and finally it becomes habitual. Dr Grimshaw’s real nature was disclosed by his great kindness to the poor, whom he served freely and well, by the fact that he made friends and retained them to the end, and by his love for children. It was always evident, at the reunions of the old Fourth Delaware, of which he was colonel, that his men were unaffectedly fond of him and proud of him. Dr Grimshaw’s life was useful. He served his country well and his community well. He was a clear man, honorable, just and sympathetic, and those who knew him will long remember his grim frankness and gentle heart.

 

Documentation of Civil War Service in the Official Record

Arthur’s service in the Civil War is documented in no fewer than 47 places in the official records1 of the war. The dates of these events, and their locations in the records, are shown below. A future update of this webpage will include a summary of each event.

 

Event

Page

Series

Volume

Part

Pub Yr

7/16/1862

227

2

4

1899

8/2/1862

290

3

2

1899

8/13/1862

375

3

2

1899

9/20/1862

338

1

19

2

1887

1/2/1863

969

1

51

1

1897

1/31/1863

1094

1

18

1887

3/31/1863

576

1

18

1887

4/4/1863

1001

1

51

1

1897

4/7/1863

1001

1

51

1

1897

4/9/1863

260

1

18

1887

5/31/1863

734

1

18

1887

6/14/1863

1056

1

51

1

1897

6/30/1863

439

1

27

3

1890

6/30/1863

451

1

27

3

1890

7/15/1863

856

1

27

2

1890

7/18/1863

722

1

27

3

1890

7/31/1863

809

1

27

3

1890

8/2/1863

831

1

27

3

1890

8/3/1863

837

1

27

3

1890

8/3/1863

837

1

27

3

1890

8/14/1863

47

1

29

2

1890

8/31/1863

133

1

29

2

1891

9/14/1863

181

1

29

2

1891

9/23/1863

225

1

29

2

1891

9/26/1863

232

1

29

2

1891

9/26/1863

232

1

29

2

1891

10/19/1863

357

1

29

2

1891

12/31/1863

610

1

29

2

1891

1/31/1864

474

1

33

1891

2/26/1864

601

1

33

1891

2/29/1864

617

1

33

1891

4/15/1864

874

1

33

1891

4/20/1864

306

1

33

1891

4/20/1864

926

1

33

1891

4/30/1864

1049

1

33

1891

5/9/1864

413

1

37

1

1891

5/31/1864

377

1

36

3

1891

8/10/1864

627

1

36

1

1891

8/13/1864

476

1

40

1

1891

9/30/1864

140

1

42

1

1893

10/13/1864

209

1

42

3

1893

10/13/1864

209

1

42

3

1893

10/27/1864

156

1

42

1

1893

10/31/1864

451

1

42

3

1893

10/31/1864

461

1

42

3

1893

11/0/1864

60

1

42

1

1893

11/0/1864

62

1

42

1

1893

Photo and Signature

The photo shown below, apparently of Arthur Grimshaw, is borrowed from the following webpage:   http://www.kyledesign.com/civil2.html#grim1


Col. Grimshaw

The photo is accompanied by the following text:

On June 4th (1863), the 4th Delaware was on expedition from Yorktown to Walkerton and Aylett’s, Virginia. They had now been assigned to The Department of Washington. Their Commanding Officer was still Col. A. H. Grimshaw of Delaware.’

The website also has (http://www.kyledesign.com/roster.html) a roster for Company G of the 4th Delaware, which includes the following additional information and facsimile signature for Arthur:

Grimshaw, Arthur H., M.D.  Colonel, wounded Jun 18, 1964, resigned Dec. 1864; married Elizabeth A. Bailey on Apr. 10, 1850.

A.H. Grimshaw

Delaware Civil War Society Background Information

Additional information on Arthur Grimshaw’s 4th Delaware Regiment is given on the website of the Delaware Civil War Society (http://www.dcws.org) as follows (underline added by webpage author):

 

The Delaware Civil War Society

P.O. Box 3205

Wilmington, Delaware 19804-0205

Statement of Purpose

The Delaware Civil War Society is an incorporated 501(c)(3) not for Profit organization dedicated to recognizing the efforts of the “First State” during the American Civil War. Unlike many Civil War organizations which are formed for a single project, the DCWS will be a permanent body dedicated to honoring the effort and sacrifices of Delawareans during the 1860’s.

FIRST STATE REGIMENTS http://web.archive.org/web/20140710173045/http://www.dcws.org/2de-hist.html)

Delaware’s Manpower Contribution To The Union In The Civil War

By: Jack Pickett

 

Delaware, especially considering its small size, provided a large number of fighting men to the Union cause during the American Civil War. The best sources within the State archives indicate that there were 11,236 white soldiers, 94 sailors and marine and a total of 954 black soldiers from the First State. That makes a grand total of 12,284 Delawareans who fought for the Union out of total state population (male and female) of about 110,000 total according to the 1860 census. This number includes all branches of service…artillery, infantry, cavalry along with the marines and sailors.

 

This article will provide short descriptions of the various infantry units only. These infantry units were divided into two different categories at that time. These two were the Volunteer Militia and the Wartime Organizations.

The Volunteer Militia consisted of the units which were formed in whole or in large part from organizations which had existed prior to the start of the American Civil War. The State of Delaware had abandoned the previous policy of universal militia service which had been in place since 1829. The state now relied on the ‘Volunteer Company Act’ of the year 1845 to provide state defense. This act allowed the local companies to form into complete battalions and regiments of volunteer militia. By the year 1860, Delaware had many volunteer militia companies which had been active for a number of years. It was these volunteer organizations which became the nucleus for the First and Second Delaware Volunteer Infantry Regiments, and why these two regiments were able to organize so quickly when the call came.


First Regiment Delaware Volunteers…under President Abraham Lincoln’s first call for volunteers, 75,000 men were needed for three months
service to ‘put down the rebellion.’ Delaware’s quota of this first call for volunteers was 780 men. This was rapidly met by the formation of the First Regiment Delaware Volunteers which was mustered into Federal service on May 28, 1861. At that time it had 37 officers and 742 enlisted men under the command of Colonel Henry H. Lockwood. This 90 day unit was mustered out early on August 17, 1861.


Second Regiment Delaware Volunteers…Shortly after that first call to arms, when the more serious nature of the war began to show itself, there was a second call, this time for 300,000 three year men. The Second Regiment Delaware Volunteers – The Crazy Delawares – was the state’s response to this call. They were mustered in on May 21, 1861 under Colonel W. H. Wharton and Lt. Col. William P. Bailey. In order to respond as rapidly as they did (and thus filling the state’s second quota) four companies were recruited from nearby counties in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Companies B, D and G were from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Company C was from Elkton, Maryland. The Second Delaware mustered in with 33 officers and 805 men. The Crazy Delawares fought in all the major campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. The mustering out took place between July 1st and October 1st of 1864. This was due to the late addition of the last four companies to the regiment in October of 1861 .

On October 17, 1861, the First Delaware was reorganized and mustered in as the state’s second three year regiment. This time around the First Delaware had 37 officers and 846 men under Colonel John W. Andrews.


Third Delaware Infantry…was mustered in for three years service between February and May of 1862. The Third Delaware was under the command of Colonel Samuel H. Jenkins and consisted of 30 officers and 780 men. The entire regiment was mustered out on July 3, 1865.


Fourth Delaware Infantry…was under the command of Colonel A. H. Grimshaw and mustered in for three years of Federal service between June and September of 1862. This regiment was mustered out on June 3, 1865.

These first four regiments all saw combat from the spring of 1862 through the end of the Civil War. They took part in all the major operations in the eastern theater of-the war. They all suffered heavy casualties at the major Battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, The Wilderness and Petersburg.


Fifth Delaware Infantry…was organized for only nine months service. The regiment mustered in 37 officers and 878 men during October and November of 1862. They were all mustered out in August, 1863. Their contributions included guarding railroad bridges in Maryland along with guard duty in Delaware at certain critical industries and served on Pea Patch Island as prison guards for the steadily growing number of Confederate prisoners being held at Fort Delaware.


Sixth Delaware Infantry…was also a nine month organization. They mustered in with 38 officers and 837 men under Colonel Edwin Wilmer during the months of October and November, 1862. They mustered out in August, 1863.


Seventh Delaware Infantry….was an emergency unit that was formed solely as a response to Confederate General Jubal Early’s raid into Maryland in July of 1864. This was a 30 day unit of 33 officers and 945 enlisted men that was mustered out on August 12, 1864.


Eighth Delaware Infantry…was unusual in that it mustered in as a battalion, rather than as a full sized regiment. It was mustered in for one year’s duty in October of 1864 with only 9 officers and 283 men in the ranks. The Eighth saw duty with the Army of the Potomac at the siege of Petersburg.


Ninth Delaware Infantry…mustered in for 100 days service under Lt. Colonel Charles Bird in September and October of 1864. The Ninth was formed solely to act as prison guards at Fort Delaware. The Ninth had 27 officers and 684 men and was mustered out on January 23, 1865.

There was one more Delaware regiment on the records of the Army of the Potomac. In the fall of 1864, most of the surviving members of the First and Second Delaware Regiments reenlisted for “…the duration of the war.” The men from these two well-blooded regiments were mustered in as the First Delaware Veteran Volunteer Infantry.

Arthur Harper’s Last Will and Testament

A copy of Arthur Harper’s will was found on the internet at the address shown below. The text of the will follows the webpage address. It is included on this webpage because it references many of the Grimshaws in Arthur Harper Grimshaw’s family line. Although A.H Grimshaw was apparently named for Arthur Harper, the exact connection to the William Grimshaw (A.H. Grimshaw’s father) is not yet known for this website.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hrpr/harperarthur.htm

 

Georgia: Richmond County: Arthur Harper Last Will and Testament, 8 July 1829

Be it remembered, that I Arthur Harper of the City of Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania considering the uncertainty of this life and the certainty of death, do make ordain and publish this my last will and testament in manner following to say –

First, I do order and direct all my just debts and funeral expenses to be paid.

Item, I give and bequeath to my two nieces Maria Harper and Cindy Waters the sum of five hundred dollars equally to be divided between them and to be paid by my executors in one year after my decease or sooner if convenient.

Item I give and bequeath to Charlotte, Isabella, Hannah and Eliza Ann Grinshaw the four daughters of William Grinshaw Esq. The sum of two hundred dollars equally to be divided between them and to be paid by my executors immediately after my decease.

Item, I give and bequeath to William A. Grinshaw and his three brothers, James, Jackson and Anthony the sum of two hundred dollars to be paid by my executors immediately after my decease, to the said William A. Grinshaw for the use of himself and his ____ ____.

Item, I give and bequeath to the Historian? Society for the ___ grants from Ireland the sum of one hundred dollars to be placed of interest for the use and benefit of poor emigrants from Ireland.

Item I give and bequeath to the managers of the house of Refuge ____ Philadelphia the sum of one hundred dollars for the use of the said ____ situation.

Item I give and bequeath to the Presbyterian Church at Allentown in East ____ the sum of one hundred dollars to be paid by my executors to the Trustees of said Church.

Item I give and bequeath to the said William Grinshaw Esq. Eleven volumes of the British Encyclopedia.

Item, I………………….bequeath to my son in law Ebinezer Jackson a certain Bond & Mortgage given to me by the said William Grinshaw for four thousand two hundred and forty four dollars and all the monies due and to grow due therein, to hold the same in trust for the sole and separate use and benefit of the said Charlotte, Isabella, Harriet, and Eliza Ann Grinshaw the four daughters of the said William Grinshaw share and share alike the interest thereof to be paid annually to the said four daughters in equal parts until they severally arrive at lawful age at which time the portion of the principal thereof to be paid to each of them respectively, the first payment of ____ to be make at the espiration of one year after my decease and in case of the decease of either of the four daughters before arriving of age and without four, then her share to go, and I do bequeath the same to the survivors or survivor, and in case of the death of all of them, under age and without four, then the same to go and I do bequeath the same to their brothers in equal parts and in the ____ of the principal of the said Bond and Mortgage being paid in then I do direct the same to be invested in some productive stock or other good security and to be subject to the same trusts and dispositions as above mentioned.

Item. I bequeath to the said William Grinshaw in trust for the sole use and benefit of his son Anthony Harper Grinshaw the sum of five hundred dollars to be paid to the said to the said Arthur Harper Grinshaw when he arrives of age and the interest thereof in the mean time to be paid annually to the said Arthur Harper Grinshaw or expended in his education as he the said William Grinshaw may deem expediant, and in case of his death under age, unmarried and without ifsue, then I bequeath the same to his brothers and sisters surviving share and share alike.

Item I give and devise to my son in Law the said Ebenezer Jackson and my daughter Eliza Ann Jackson his wife two certain lots of ground now part of the ___ ____ Walnut Grove Near Middletown in the State of Connecticut, the south side of Walnut Street between Tenth and Eleventh in the City of Philadelphia wherein I lately resided together with the appurtenances to hold to them the said Charles A. Harper and Charles Waters their heirs and afsigns in trust for the sole and separate use and behoof of my said daughter Eliza Ann Jackson her heirs and afsigns forever.

Item I give and bequeath to the said Charles A. Harper and Charles Waters the following shares of Bank and Insurance stocks viz- one hundred shares in the Bank of the State of Georgia, fifty shares in the Augusta Bank, one hundred shares in the Augusta Insurance and Banking Company State of Georgia, one hundred shares in the Bank of South Carolina in Charleston, fifty shares in the Union Bank of Charleston, South Carolina. One hundred and twenty shares in the Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Philadelphia. Twenty shares in the Bank of the United States. Twenty shares in the Kensington Bank. Two shares in the Southwark Bank. One hundred and three shares in the American Fire Insurance Company located in Philadelphia. One hundred and nineteen shares in the Chilicothe Bank in the State of Ohio and two shares in the Chesapeake and Delaware Land Company to hold the said above inumerated shares of bank and insurance and Canal stocks to them the said Charles A. Harper and Charles Waters in trust nevertheless for the sole and separate use and benefit of my daughter the said Eliza Ann Jackson her heirs and afsigns.

Item and all the rest residue and remainder of my estate real and personal and mixed whatsoever and wheresoever situate, I give, direct and bequeath the same to my said daughter, Eliza Ann Jackson her heirs and afsigns forever to and for her sole and separate use. And lastly I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint the said Ebenezer Jackson, Eliza Ann Jackson, Charles A. Harper and Charles Waters Executors of this my Last will and Testament hereby revoking all others by me at any time heretofore made. I do declare this ____ to contain my last will and testament. In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal this eighth day of July annodomini one thousand eight hundred and twenty nine 1829

Arthur Harper

Signed sealed published and declared by the above named Arthur Harper as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us.

E. F. Brazier

Jno. Purdon

Saml. I. Curtis

Memorandum – showing how I have heretofore disposed of a part of my estate. I have afsigned and delivered a certain Bond for four thousand one hundred dollars dated Sept 25 1816 witnefsed by Marly Co__thwonte and James Cooper the principal and interest due and to ____ ____ for the sole use and benefit of William Grinshaw five thousand share alike. I have also transferred to my son in law Ebenezer Jackson fifty shares in the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company which he holds in his own right, and I have likewise by deed of gift in October 1827 conveyed to my said son in law and daughter all that farm called Walnut Grove near Middletown in the State of Connecticut with the appurtenances upon the terms and estate mentioned in the conveyance thereof.

Philadelphia, October 20th 1832. Then personally appeared John Purdon And on the 22 October 1832 Samuel I. Curtis two of the witnefses to the foregoing will and on their oaths did say that they were present and did see and hear Arthur Harper the testator in the said will named sign, seal, publish and declare the same as and for his last will and testament and that at the doing thereof he was of sound mind memory and understandings to the best of their knowledge and belief.

I.Humes Register

Philadelphia October 23rd 1832, There personally appeared Joseph Tagert & E. F. Brazier one of the witnefses to the foregoing will being absent and on his oath did say that he was well acquainted with Arthur Harper the testator in the foregoing will named in his life time and is acquainted with his hand writing having seen him write his name as well as other matters, that he has viewed the signature “Arthur Harper” subscribed to said will and verily believes the same to be the proper hand writing and signature of him the said Arthur Harper to the best of his knowledge and belief.

Sworn and subscribed before

Joseph Tagert

Me as above dated

J. B. Sewall, Depy Register

October 22 1832. Ebenezer Jackson one of the Executors sworn and that he would diligently and faithfully regard and will and truly comply with the provisions of the Law relating to Collateral Inheritances and on the 23 October 1832 Charles A. Harper and Charles Waters the other Executors sworn to and letters testamentary thereupon granted to them.

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania}

City County of Philadelphia}

I John Hinnis Esquire, Register of Wills for the City and County of Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and perfect copy of the last will and testament of Arthur Harper late of the said City deceased remaining on file and of record in my office. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of office this 27th day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty two.

J. Hinnis, Register

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania}

County of Philadelphia} to wit

I, Edward King, President Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the County of Philadelphia do certify to all whom it may concern that the foregoing paper purporting to be a copy of the last Will and Testament of Arthur Harper deceased left in the office of the Register of Wills for the City and County of Philadelphia is certified in due form of Law under the hand and seal of said Register.

In witnefs whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 30th day of October
A.D. 1832.

Edw. King

County of Philadelphia “to wit”

I Richard Palmeg, Prothonotary, of the Court of Common Pleas of the County of Philadelphia do hereby certify and attest that the foregoing certificate is under the hand of the Honorable Edward King Esq. President, Judge of the said Court of Common Pleas, and that the same is entitled to full faith and credit. In witnefs whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of said Court at Philadelphia the 30th day of October, A.D., 1832

R. Palmeg, Prothonotary

 

References

1Ainsworth, Fred C., and Joseph W. Kirkley, 1887-1891, The War of the Rebellion: a Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (Published under the Direction of the Hon. Elihu Root, Secretary of War): Washington, D.C., Government Printing Office, 70 Volumes (128 Books) in Series I to IV.

Home Page

Webpage posted November 2000. Updated March 2007 with addition of Arthur Harper’s last will and testament.