John L. Grimshaw, World War II 

Fighter Pilot in the 364th Fighter Group of the 384th Fighter Squadron, Based in Honington, England

 

John L Grimshaw

Home Page

John L. Grimshaw was born in Milford, Utah in 1922 and served in the U.S. Army Air Corps in World War II. He was a fighter pilot who flew P-38 and P-51 aircraft out of Honington Air Base in the southeast part of England. One of his first combat assignments after arriving in England was to fly cover for the Normandy invasion on D-Day, June 6, 1944. On November 21, 1944, he filed an “Encounter Report” in which he claimed to have shot down a German fighter, an FW-190, and to have damaged another, an ME-109.

After the war, John apparently returned to Utah, where he passed away in Bountiful in 2001. He worked for the Union Pacific Railroad for 38 years before retiring. John Grimshaw is descended from the Duckworth Grimshaw line. Duckworth emigrated from England to Beaver, Utah in 1862 and is described on a companion webpage.

Webpage Credits

Photo Including Lt. John L. Grimshaw

John L Grimshaw’s Encounter Report

Description of 364th Fighter Group and 384th Fighter Squadron

P51 Mustang Description

Focke-Wulf 190 and Messerschmitt 109, German Fighters Engaged by John Grimshaw

Van Nuys, California, Training Base for the 384th Fighter Squadron

Honington, England, 384th Fighter Squadron Base of Operations

University of Utah Honors John Grimshaw, Veterans’ Day, 2000

Obituaries of John Grimshaw

John Grimshaw’s Ancestors and Descendants

References

Webpage Credits

Thanks go to the University of Utah for posting information on the Veterans’ Day award given to John Grimshaw in 2000.

Photo Including Lt. John L. Grimshaw

John Grimshaw is the left-most standing individual in the following picture. The fighter aircraft behind the group is a P-51 Mustang. The source of the photo is shown below the image.

 

Capt. Bruce C Ward. 384th Fighter Squadron. P-51D 44-14032 5Y-W “My Norma”.

Photographed with “My Norma” are (L-R) Standing: Lt. John L Grimshaw; Lt. Lawrence E Muskavitch; Capt. George Z Schroeder; Capt. Ward; Lt. Harry C Schwartz; & Capt. Richard L Stiefvater. Kneeling: Capt. Daniel L Leftwich & Lt. William E Randolph.

Photo: Paul Miller

Source: http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/gallery.php Group=364&Style=item&origStyle=list&Item=17&Temp=1161&searchString= 

 

John L Grimshaw’s Encounter Report

John filed the following “Encounter Report”, claiming to have shot down one enemy aircraft and damaged another, in November 1944.

Note the similarity of the serial number to that of “My Norma” above (44-14148 vs. 44-14032). Perhaps John’s aircraft came off the assembly line 116 planes after “My Norma”.

What happened to John’s aircraft? The following information indicates that not long after John filed his Encounter Report on November 21, his P-51 (Serial Number 44-14848) may have been shot down while being flown by another pilot (Lt. Lawrence Visconti), who was killed in action on December 12, 1944.

 

44-14147P-51D3845Y-A     
44-14148P-51D3845Y-MViscontiLt. LawrenceLaurie’s EleanorLost in this a/c 12 Dec 44 – KIA10883
44-14174P-51D3845Y-    Lost 11 Sept 44 – Lt. Alfred A Albrecht KIA8785

Source: http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/364thfg.php action=list_records&recs=50&sort_order=ASC&order_by=Squ&recs=50&next_ age=6#tabletop 

Description of 364th Fighter Group and 384th Fighter Squadron

Considerable detail on John Grimshaw’s unit, the 364th, is available on a website and is provided below.

THE 364th FIGHTER GROUP

8th AIR FORCE

 

The 364th Fighter Group had one of the best records in the E.T.O. despite the fact that they were activated late and arrived in England after most of the fighter groups were there. The Group flew combat missions from 2 March 1944 to 6 May 1945. During that time 455 enemy planes were destroyed, 24 were probably destroyed, and 282 were damaged.

The Group was activated 1 June 1943 and General Order #14 was issued at March Field, California 8 June 1943. The Group was organized at Army Airdrome, Glendale, California and assigned to the Los Angeles Air Defense Wing lV Fighter Command 10 June 1942

The 383rd Fighter Squadron trained at Oxnard, CA Air Base under the command of Captain Robert B. Wilson. The 384th Fighter Squadron trained at Ontario, CA Air Base under the Command of Captain John H. Lowell. The 385th Squadron trained at the Santa Maria, CA Air Base under the command of Captain Richard D. Neece Jr. The 364th Fighter Group Headquarters was at the Ontario Air Base. Major Frederick C. Grambo became the Group Commander 12 June 1943.

By 27 December 1943 the squadrons moved to Santa Maria for final staging. Group Headquarters had preceded them on 7 December 1943. On 29 December the POM inspectors started inspecting the squadrons. Because the units had been so well trained the inspection was finished in two days.

On 13 January 1944 the big question, of whether the 364th was going to the Pacific or the Atlantic War Theater, was answered when orders were received stating that the Group would move to Camp Shanks, New York via troop train on the 14th. The Group arrived at Camp Shanks on 19 January 1944. Overseas physicals started within a day or so after arrival. On 30 January 1944 Captain Robert Wilson, Commanding Officer of the 383rd, was found to have a spot on lung and was not allowed to go overseas, His Executive Officer, Captain Joseph B. McManus replaced him as the 383rd C.O.

On 1 February 1944 the Group was loaded on the luxury liner, Queen Elizabeth, and started the journey to England the next day. On 8 February the “Queen” arrived at Glasgow, Scotland and the next day was sent to Honington Air Base near Bury St. Edmunds. The base was a former Royal Air Force Base. The rest of February was spent receiving aircraft and testing them, setting up equipment and getting organized, Both pilots and ground crews were sent to other bases to enhance their skills. During this period Lt. Col. Grambo and Captain McManus went to the 20th Fighter Group for mission orientation. McManus completed three successful flights but Col. Grambo was shot down over Holland on his second mission and lost his life. He never had the opportunity to lead the 364th on a mission. Lt. Col. Roy W. Osborn left the 352nd Fighter Group to take command of the 364th

On 2 March 1944 the Group flew its first mission supplying withdrawal for bombers returning from Germany. The first four missions were led by Major Mark Shipman, C.O. of the 38th Fighter Squadron, 55th Fighter Group. Col. Osborn led mission No.5 and Shipman No. 6 and then returned to the 55th. On mission 5 on the way out, seven Me-109’s attacked the bombers. Captain John Lowell shot down two of the enemy and Lt. Sam Phillips damaged one, These were the first victories for the 364th. Lt. Larry Ferguson was lost when a P-38 was seen going down with a parachutist nearby. Though several books and articles have been written saying that the P-38 did not have the range to fly to Berlin, several of the 364th’s early missions were to the Berlin area.

On July 1944 some P-51’s appeared at Honington. Pilots were instructed to check out in them when they had spare time. By 1 August 1944 the 364th had become a P-51 Group.. The difference between the P-38 and the P-51 is shown in the ratio between enemy planes destroyed versus 364th pilots lost. The P-38 was flown approximately five months and had a ratio 1.3. The P-51 was flown approximately nine months and had a ratio of 5.0. It is interesting that in the 67th Fighter Wing the 364th was the last Group to become active, yet finished second in planes destroyed. The Group destroyed 261 planes in the air, had 24 probables and 106 damaged. On the ground 194 planes were destroyed and 282 damaged. Records on train cars, engines, buildings, flak towers, troops etc., were not available.

The pilots earned:

Air Medals 1586

DFC’s 176

DSC’ 4

Silver Stars 16

Purple Hearts 6

Croix de Guerre 4

British DFC 1

The Group was awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation for the 27 December 1944 mission when the 47 pilots on the mission sighted 200 FW-190’s and Me-109’s. They aggressively attacked the enemy and destroyed 28. The Group lost one pilot.

Col. J. Bradley McManus and Col. John Lowell both served a short period as Commanding Officer of the Group while Col. Roy Osborn was in the Zone of Interior. In January 1945 Col. Eugene Roberts replaced Col. Osborn and served until the Group returned to the States and was deactivated.

The 364th left England on 4 November 1945 on the Queen Mary. Landing in New York, the men were sent to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. Most of the men were sent to bases around the country for discharge, Others were given furloughs. On 10 November 1945 the 364th Fighter Group was deactivated.

Aces were (scores in the group only- some scored victories while flying in other groups):

HQ: Maj. Ernest Bankey (7½)

383rd FS: Lt/Col. George F. Ceuleers (10½); Major Samuel Wicker (7); Maj. Ernest Bankey (1)

384th FS: Capt. James M. Fowle (8); Lt/Col John Lowell (7½)

385th FS: Captain Gilbert L. Jamison (7); Capt. James J Pascoe (5½);

Lt. William F. Wilson (5); Maj. Ernest Bankey (1)

Air Force Assigned to: 8th AF (Jan. ’44 – end WWII)

Stations flown from: Honington, England (Feb ’44 – end WWII)

Campaigns:

Air Offensive, Europe

Normandy

Northern France

Rhineland

Arnennes-Alsace

Central Europe

Decorations: Distinguished Unit Citation: Frankfurt, Germany, 27 Dec. ’44

Source: http://www.web-birds.com/8th/364/364.html

 

Additional information was found on another website and is shown below.

 

The 364th Fighter Group

Station: Honington 10 February 1944 to 3 November 1945

Station Callsign: Outside

Group Callsign:

Sunhat (A Group)

Weekday (B Group)

Harlop (C Group)

(No Squadron Callsigns in C Group)

384th Fighter Squadron

Code: 5Y

Symbol: Square

Callsign:

Goldfish (A Group)

Zeeta (B Group)

Logo of the 384th Fighter Squadron,

364th Fighter Group, 8th U.S. Army Air Force

 

Source: http://www.littlefriends.co.uk/364thfg.php searchString=grim&Submit=Search 

 

P51 Mustang Description

Excellent descriptions of the P-51 Mustang have been located on the Internet and are shown below.

Source: http://www.web-birds.com/8th/364/384profile.html 

 

Source: http://www.jetplanes.co.uk/vintageaircraft/p51mustang.html

P51 Mustang

The legendary North American P51 Mustang single engined piston fighter of ww2 started life as a British requirement for a high performance fighter aircraft in 1940.

The aircraft was designed and the first prototype manufactured in under 4 months. An amazing accomplishment for such an advanced aircraft.

The early Mustangs were powered by Allison in-line aero engines producing around 1,100 hp.

First delivery of the Mustang was made in 1942 to British RAF squadrons. The machine lacked the performance required due to the Allison engine originally fitted. To overcome this lack of performance the aircraft was experimentally re-engined by the British with the excellent Roll-Royce Merlin engine which had proven itself in the Spitfire and Hurricane. The plane was transformed into the superb machine that would become the legend.

Back in America the P51 was redesigned to accomodate the Merlin and production examples from then on used Packard built Merlins.

Merlin powered P51B and P51C Mustangs were issued to both RAF and USAAF squadrons.

The finest of the Mustangs was however the P51D powered by a Packard built V12 Merlin which produced nearly 1,700 hp. This machine could do about 440 mph in level flight, carried six heavy machine guns in the laminer-flow wing and could be fitted with rockets or 2,000lbs of ordnance for ground attack missions.

This machine when fitted with drop tanks could escort the US heavy bomber formations all the way to the targets and back, a feat no other single engined fighter could adequately manage. The Mustang was also a supremely capable dog-fighter which could take on any fighter aircraft put up to intercept the formations (until the appearance of ME262 jets and rocket propelled ME163 aircraft).

 

 

EnginePackard built V12 Merlin. Nearly 1,700 hp
Top
Speed
439 mph
WeightApprox. 9,800 lb
Length32.25 ft
WingspanApprox. 37 ft
Weapons6x Browning half inch machine guns in the wings of the aircraft. 2,000lb external ordnance including rocket capability.
CrewOne
CountryUSA

 

Source: http://www.jetplanes.co.uk/vintageaircraft/p51mustang.html

 

Focke-Wulf 190 and Messerschmitt 109 (aka Bf 109), German Fighters Engaged by John Grimshaw

Excellent photos and descriptions of the two fighter aircraft claimed by John Grimshaw were found on the internet and are provided below.

Focke-Wulf 190

The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 was widely regarded as Germany’s best fighter. It was more than a match for the contemporary Spitfires. Shown below is the FW-190 of Ost. Maj. Hermann Graf, France 1943.

Source: http://www.aviation-history.com/focke wulf/fw190.html

 

 

The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger (“shrike”), often called Butcher-bird, was a single-seat, single-engine fighter aircraft of Germany’s Luftwaffe, and one of the best fighters of its generation. Used extensively during the Second World War, over 20,000 were manufactured, including around 6,000 fighter-bomber models. Production ran from 1941 to the end of hostilities, during which time the aircraft was continually updated. Its final incarnations retained qualitative parity with Allied fighter planes, although Fw 190s lagged far behind in production numbers.

The Fw 190 was well liked by its pilots, and widely regarded as superior to the front line Supermarine Spitfire Mk V on its combat debut in 1941. Compared to the Bf 109, the Fw 190 was a “workhorse,” employed in and proved suitable for a wide variety of roles, including ground attack, long-range bomber escort, night-fighter and (especially in the “D” version) high-altitude interceptor.

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke Wulf_Fw_190 

Messerschmitt 109 (aka Bf 109)

 

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 was a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt in the early 1930s. It was one of the first true modern fighters of the era, including such features as an all-metal monocoque construction, a closed canopy, and retractable landing gear. The Bf 109 was produced in greater quantities than any other fighter aircraft in history, with 30,573 units built alone during 1939-1945. Fighter production totalled 47% of all German aircraft production, and the Bf 109 accounted for 57% of all fighter types produced.

Bf 109 was the initial Reichsluftfahrtministerium (the German Air Ministry) designation, since the design was sent in by the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke company, and used exclusively in all official German documents dealing with this aircraft family. After the company was renamed to Messerschmitt AG after July 1938, when Erhard Milch finally allowed Willy Messerschmitt to acquire the company, from that date forward, all Messerschmitt aircraft were to carry the “Me” designation — at least in theory, as wartime documents from Messerschmitt AG, the RLM and others continued to use both designations, sometimes even on the same page. Me 109 is known to have been the name used in print by the Luftwaffe propaganda publications as well as by the Messerschmitt company itself after July 1938, and the Luftwaffe personnel, who pronounced it may hundert-neun. The Me 109 (pronounced “emm ee one-oh-nine”) designation was usually used in the English-speaking world. However, in both wartime and contemporary literature, both the “Bf” and “Me” prefixes are used, and both are considered valid and accurate— although some debate still occurs over this issue from time to time.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messerschmitt_Bf_109

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BF109BLACK6.jpg 

Van Nuys, California, Training Base for the 384th Fighter Squadron

The 384th trained at the Van Nuys Training Base before deploying to England. The following information is from a website describing the base. According to this information, the 384th Fighter Squadron trained at Van Nuys from August 12 to October 11, 1943 (shown in bold below).

Van Nuys Airport

Army Air Force Base Unit and Air National Guard Site

Site Plan

 

Army Air Force Base Unit at Metropolitan Airport (1942-1945)

1942 – February, U.S. Government acquires 163 acres of the Metropolitan Airport. Additional 64 tracts of land were purchased on the west side for Army Air Force Base Unit.

1942 – November, U.S. Army constructs the 6,000 foot North South runway and 3,800 foot East West runway.

1943 – August, U.S. Army established 364th Fighter Group, Metropolitan Airport, Van Nuys, flying Lockheed P-38 Lightnings.

12 August 1943 to 11 October 1943

383rd Fighter Squadron (Code N2) P-38 Lightning

 

384th Fighter Squadron (Code 5Y) P-38 Lightning

 

385th Fighter Squadron (Code 5E) P-38 Lightning

 

1943 – October, U.S. Army established 474th Fighter Group, Metropolitan Airport, Van Nuys, flying Lockheed P-38 Lightnings.

1 October 1943 to 4 January 1944

428th Fighter Squadron (Code F5) P-38 Lightning

429th Fighter Squadron (Code 7Y) P-38 Lightning

430th Fighter Squadron (Code K6) P-38 Lightning

1944 – U.S. Army established 441st Army Air Force Base Unit at Metropolitan Airport, Van Nuys, a Lockheed P-38 Lightning Combat Crew Training Squadron (CCTS) base.

441st. AAFBU Box 117

Metropolitan Airport

Van Nuys, California

Training sorties typically involved flights to the gunnery ranges in the Channel Islands. A sub-base was established as Oxnard Army Air Field with a 5,000 ft runway. (Modern day Camarillo Airport, CMA)

373rd Gunnery Training established.

1945 – May, base converts to Northrop P-61 Black Window training.

1945 – November, U.S. Army Air Force Base Unit closed.

Aircraft 

Lockheed P-38 Lightning (G, H, J and L models)

Northrop P-61B Black Window

Source: http://www.mar-prod.com/plantsvny/AVNY.htm

 

Modern maps showing the location of Van Nuys Airport northwest of Los Angeles (near Burbank) are provided below.

Honington, England, 384th Fighter Squadron Base of Operations

The location of Honington in England, where the 384th Squadron was based, is shown in the following maps.

University of Utah Honors John Grimshaw, Veterans’ Day, 2000

In celebration of Veterans’ Day each year, the University of Utah selects about 11 veterans for recognition for extraordinary military service, including a special medallion. John Grimshaw was selected along with nine others in 2000. The following images are from the website commemorating John Grimshaw and his World War II service. Note the brief but eloquent description of John’s service as a fighter pilot in 1944.

Source: http://www.veteransday.utah.edu/honorees_slices/2000/!grimshaw_final.htm 

The commemoration for 2007 is scheduled for November 9. If the event in which John was recognized occurred on November 2000, he lived for just seven or eight months after receiving his award, as he passed away in June 2001.

Obituaries of John Grimshaw

Two obituaries were published on June 9, 2001 – one in the Salt Lake Tribune and the other in the Deseret News. Copies of the obituaries from a companion webpage are shown below.

 

38

Salt Lake Tribune, The (UT) – June 9, 2001

Deceased Name: John L. Grimshaw

BOUNTIFUL- John L. Grimshaw, 78, passed away June 7, 2001 in Bountiful, Utah, after a
courageous battle with cancer. Born August 7, 1922 in Milford, Utah, John was the eldest son of Clarence and Anna H. Griffith Grimshaw. Following Anna’s death, he was raised by his step-mother, Edythe Farnow Grimshaw. John married Dorothy Campeau on December 6, 1946 in Milford, Utah. He was stationed in England during World War II, where he flew P-38 and P-51 fighters over Germany. He remained a staunch patriot throughout his life, serving as a volunteer with the 8th Air Force Society and at the Hill Aerospace Museum. John also had a passionate love for music, devoting 26 years of his life to singing with, and serving as a member of the Beehive Statesmen SPEBSQSA Chorus. Retired from the UPRR after 38 years of service. Above all, John loved his family and was proud of them.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two children, Cassandra (Candy) (Robert) Russell, Orem, UT; Kenneth (Cleo) Grimshaw, Ft. Collins, CO; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters, Douglas Farnow, Anna M. Hickman, Norma Christiansen, St. George, UT; and Russell Grimshaw, Salt Lake City, UT. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Lory Grimshaw.

Funeral services will be held Monday, June 11, 2001 at 10 a.m. at the Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main where friends may call Sunday evening from 6-8 p.m. and again Monday morning 8:45-9:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment will be at the Milford City Cemetery on Monday at 4:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family suggests donations in John’s name to the Milford Memorial Valley Hospital, Milford, Utah, or the Huntsman Cancer Institute, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, Utah.

The family would like to thank Dr. Val Hansen and staff and also Dr. Regina Klein and staff for all their support, compassion and care.

Salt Lake Tribune, The (UT)

Date: June 9, 2001

Edition: Final

Page: D6

Record Number: 100E872F22E0CD42

(c) 2001 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Media NewsGroup, Inc. by NewsBank, Inc.


39

Deseret News, The (Salt Lake City, UT) – June 9, 2001

Deceased Name: Obituary: John L. Grimshaw

BOUNTIFUL- John L. Grimshaw, 78, passed away June 7, 2001 in Bountiful, Utah, after a courageous battle with cancer. Born August 7, 1922 in Milford, Utah, John was the eldest son of Clarence and Anna H. Griffith Grimshaw. Following Anna’s death, he was raised by his step-mother, Edythe Farnow Grimshaw. John married Dorothy Campeau on December 6, 1946 in Milford, Utah. He was stationed in England during World War II, where he flew P-38 and P-51 fighters over Germany. He remained a staunch patriot throughout his life, serving as a volunteer with the 8th Air Force Society and at the Hill Aerospace Museum. John also had a passionate love for music, devoting 26 years of his life to singing with, and serving as a member of the Beehive Statesmen SPEBSQSA Chorus. Retired from the UPRR after 38 years of service. Above all, John loved his family and was proud of them.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two children, Cassandra (Candy) (Robert) Russell, Orem, UT; Kenneth (Cleo) Grimshaw, Ft. Collins, CO; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters, Douglas Farnow, Anna M. Hickman, Norma Christiansen, St. George, UT; and Russell Grimshaw, Salt Lake City, UT. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Lory Grimshaw.

Funeral services will be held Monday, June 11, 2001 at 10 a.m. at the Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main where friends may call Sunday evening from 6-8 p.m. and again Monday morning 8:45-9:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment will be at the Milford City Cemetery on Monday at 4:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family suggests donations in John’s name to the Milford Memorial Valley Hospital, Milford, Utah, or the Huntsman Cancer Institute, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, Utah.

The family would like to thank Dr. Val Hansen and staff and also Dr. Regina Klein and staff for all their support, compassion and care.

Deseret News, The (Salt Lake City, UT)

Date: June 9, 2001

Edition: All

Page: B06

Record Number: 0106110183

Copyright (c) 2001 Deseret News Publishing Company

John Grimshaw’s Ancestors and Descendants

John Grimshaw was descended from Duckworth Grimshaw, who immigrated to Utah from Lancashire in 1862. He is the subject of a companion webpage. John Grimshaw’s ancestors and descendants are shown in the following chart.

George Grimshaw (About 1739 – ) & Betty (About 1741 – )

|—–Thomas Grimshaw (About 1765 – ) & Susan Fielden (About 1769 – )

|—–|—–Lawrence Grimshaw (6 Oct 1782 – ) & Mary Duckworth (4 Apr 1786 – )

|—–|—–|—–John Grimshaw* (12 Jun 1811 – ) & Alice Whittaker (28 Dec 1809 – )

|—–|—–|—–|—–James Grimshaw (20 Feb 1837 – )

|—–|—–|—–|—–Mary Grimshaw (9 Mar 1838 – ) & William Atkinson (About 1834 – )

|—–|—–|—–|—–Duckworth Grimshaw* (3 Mar 1842 – ) & Mary Jane Moyes (6 Jun 1850 – )

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–John Grimshaw ( – ) & Mary Elizabeth Bradfield (28 Apr 1872 – 12 Oct 1937)

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Karl Grimshaw (12 Mar 1897, Beaver, UT – 27 Sep 1982) & Ruby Tolton (23 May 1898, Beaver, UT – 15 Feb 1998). Married 29 Jun 1917, Salt Lake City, UT.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Clarence Grimshaw *(22 May 1895, Milford or Beaver, UT – 28 Mar 1965) & Anna Huey Griffith (5 Nov 1899 – 23 Jun 1927). Married 14 Nov 1919.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–John L Grimshaw (7 Aug 1922 – 7 Jun 2001) & Dorothy R Campeau. Married 6 Dec 1946.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Cassandra Grimshaw & Robert Russell

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Kenneth Grimshaw & Cleo unknown

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Lory Grimshaw 

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Russell Grimshaw 

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Anna M Grimshaw (or Farnow) & unknown Hickman

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Norma Grimshaw (or Farnow) & unknown Christiansen

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Clarence Grimshaw* (22 May 1895, Milford or Beaver, UT – 27 Mar 1965) & Edyth May (Osborn) Farnow (Abt 1899 – ?). Married 1 Apr 1929.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Douglas Farnow (step-son)

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Earl Grimshaw (2 Feb 1900, Beaver, UT – ?)

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Eva Grimshaw (12 Dec 1901, Beaver, UT – 22 Dec 1987) & John Neeley

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Olivia Grimshaw (12 Dec 1901, Beaver, UT – ?) & James Carl Dean. Married 5 Nov 1921, Beaver, UT.)

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Lenora Grimshaw (12 May 1904, Beaver, UT – 6 May 1970) & Dan Alton Smith. Married 10 Oct 1924.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Aleen Grimshaw (25 May 1906 – Beaver, UT – 26 Jan 1970, Beaver, UT) & John Dern Osborn (18 Jul 1908, Alst Lake City, UT – 16 Apr 1968, Veaver, UT). Married 25 Mar 1929.

|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–|—–Lamar Grimshaw (25 Nov 1911, Beaver, UT – 14 Dec 1971, Salt Lake City, UT) & Margaret Elizabeth Jones (30 Mar 1916, Beaver, UT – 2 Oct 2006). Married 18 Jun 1936.

References

None yet…

Home Page

Webpage posted July 2007. Updated September 2007 with addition of material from the University of Utah webpage commemorating John’s military service in 2000; webpage also finalized.