Ann (Grimshaw) and Samuel Entwistle

Entwistle, Emigrants from Lancashire to Missouri

(Note: Webpage in preparation)

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Ann Grimshaw was born in Lancashire in 1818. Her parents were Jonathan and Ann or Nancy Lisonbee or Lazenbee, and her grandparents were William and Jane (Hindle) Grimshaw. She married Samuel Entwistle in Bury on July 25, 1850. The couple emigrated to America as Mormon converts, arriving in New Orleans on April 6 or 7, 1851. They settled in Missouri, where they apparently lived in St Louis, but are buried in Maries County. They had a son, Alex Scott Entwistle, who was born shortly after their arrival (April 9) and was named for the steamboat that was carrying the couple up the Mississippi River. The couple was apparently making their way to Salt Lake City to join the Mormon community there, but did not make it past Missouri for reasons not currently known.

Webpage Credits

Family History Information from James Heady

Second Submittal of Family History Information from James Heady

Descendant Chart of Samuel and Mary (Grimshaw) Entwistle

Lawsuit Record Involving Ann and Samuel Entwistle

Connection to Mary (Grimshaw) Smith, Mormon Immigrant to Utah

Information on Ann and Samuel Entwistle from Ardis Parshall

References

Webpage Credits

Thanks go to James Heady for supplying most of the information on this webpage. Ardis Parshall provided valuable information on the voyage of Ann and Samuel Entwistle to the U.S. and up the Mississippi River from New Orleans to St. Louis.

Family History Information from James Heady

The following information on Ann (Grimshaw) and Samuel Entwistle was provided by e-mail from James Heady on April 3, 2004:

I would be happy to contribute what information I know. I am still trying to find more. Ann was born in England to Jonathan and Ann Lazenby Grimshaw. They were married in 1814 (I don’t know where). Jonathan’s father was William Grimshaw, born 1757 and Jane Hindle born 1769. They married in 1786. Ann Lazenby father was William born 1765 and Ann born 1769 (I don’t have a last name for Ann). Jane Hindle’s parents were James and Ann born 1727 and married in 1752. Jonathan is listed as a weaver on Ann’s marriage certificate. Jonathan and Ann had the following children: Jane; Mary; William; Faith; Alice; Betty; James; Riley; Margaret; Henry; and Ann. Ann Grimshaw married Samuel Entwistle July 25 1850 at the parish church in Bury, Lancashire. It is believed that they came to this country shortly after their marriage. There is a record of a Mary Entwistle born in 1851 in Bury (vol xxi, page 349, St, Catherine’s index).

This information was recorded by John Ashley and his wife Reba Parker. So it may be that this Mary is their oldest daughter born in England. The other names of the Entwistle children are Alex Scott; John Franklin; Thomas; Sarah Jane; and Margaret Ellen. All of the children died except for Margaret Ellen. Thomas is listed on the 1860 and 1870 census and we are not sure of the exact date of deaths for Samuel and the children. They are buried on Paydown Road in Maries County on land that was once owned by the Entwistles. There are large and small slabs of limestone marking the graves. According to Bill Parker and my mother who is 95 there are trees in the middle of the cemetery and maybe 15 families buried there. I sent my niece who lives in the Belle, Missouri vicinity of Maries County to the cemetery. She reports there were no dates or records kept and that it was a very primitive burying ground. Ann Entwistle is buried at the Red Cemetery in Maries County.

The date of birth on her tombstone is 1818. However on the 1860 census she is listed at 35 years of age. that would make her being born around 1825. When Samuel and Ann came to this country they lived in St. Louis, Missouri, where Samuel worked as a window glazier. It is believed it had something to do with stained glass windows. There is a deed of property in 1857 in Maries County, which was there first piece of property (Maries County didn’t actually exist until 1860). There where other properties purchased later. Samuel gives his occupation as painter (the same as he did on his marriage certificate).

There was a fire in Vienna, the county seat, and no records exist before 1910. Ann reportedly worked at the mills when she was a young girl (I’m not sure if this was Bolton). We know by the marriage certificate that Samuel could write his name whereas Ann made her mark. I have my grandmother’s Bible and a letter from her eldest sister Minnie in 1956. Both the Bible and Aunt Minnie’s letter say that their home was Leeds and that the original spelling of their name was Grempshire. There was a letter to this effect in my grandmother’s possessions that I have not been able to trace. I was only 15 when grandma died and didn’t pay all that close attention to details. But my 81 year old aunt Anna, who live in San Antonio as I do, says she has the envelope but the letter is missing. Samuel Entwistle listed his age at 40 on the 1860 census which would make his birth year around 1820. He was widower when he married Ann and had a son named Samuel. There is a passage in the family Bible says Samuel and his three aunts went to Australia. They were supposed to join the family in the U.S. but were never again heard from. The reason they went to Australia according to the family lore was the ship coming to the U.S. was full. I have not yet found the ship log. Reba Parker thinks she has that information. Samuel on his marriage certificate gives the name of his father as Joseph Greenhalgh (Greenough). Joseph according to LDS records was born February 16, 1788, Leigh, Lancashire. His father was John and his mother Martha Smith, born 1754. They married sometime in the 1770s. There is a son named Samuel in Joseph’s background but it does not give anything but a first name.

I don’t know as of yet how the name Entwistle figures in. The three sisters that went to Australia had the last name Entwistle, and I am trying to get their records. It would be interesting to know who they list as their father. Margaret Ellen Entwistle was born October 2, 1859. Her claim to fame: when she was 5 she met Abraham Lincoln during a campaign and shook his hand. She was known for the clay pipe she smoked. More than one grandchild tried the pipe and got sick. She was known as Maggie. She married John David Parker, who was born November 14, 1854. They were married December 23, 1875 at the bride’s residence by James King, probate judge of Maries County. John David’s father was Cornelious W. Parker and his mother was Charity Sauls. The Parkers were from Tennessee as were the Sauls. After Charity’s death Cornelious moved to Texas County, Missouri, where he was bushwhacked during the Civil War.

The children of John David Parker and Margaret Entwistle are as follows: Minnie Ellen, born October 28,1876; William Alfred, born December 20, 1878; Addison (known as Addie or Ad) August 21, 1881; Annie Elizabeth August 14,1884; Emily (name changed in first grade to Emma Lee), born April 14, 1887; Leona, March19, 1889; Robert Addison, Sept.17, 1891; Joseph Levi, October 3, 1893; Henry Monroe; November 29, 1895; infant daughter born September 30, 1898; John Dorsey, born June 20, 1900; Effie Fay, March 28, 1902; infant daughter, July 1905. Leona Parker died November 1, 1891; infant daughter died September 30, 1898; Annie Elizabeth, died February 1, 1900. Robert Addison died September 26, 1903; Elfie Fay died November 12, 1925; John Dorsey died July 24, 1844; William Alfred died July 4, 1948; Emma Lee Curtman-Renfrow died November 25, 1955. Minnie Roberds died January 24, 1960; Addie Ellis died December 3, 1961; Joseph Levi died April 27,1963. Henry Monroe died June 13, 1965. In 1907 John David and Maggie homesteaded a section of land in New Mexico before statehood. They went there for a better climate for an asthma condition. Maggie said she smoked her pipe to help her asthma while others say John David suffered with asthma. Their four youngest children Levi, Henry, Dorsey and Effie went with them. John David according to my mother and grandmother died in a well (water) accident in December of 1913. He was brought back to Missouri for burial. My mother who was five at the time remembers the laying out in the family home and the funeral. Levi and Henry went back to New Mexico to get the cattle and rode in the cattle cars with the cattle. Mom says her father build a corral near the house and that Levi and Henry drove the cattle from the train station in Meta, Missouri. Mom describes the cattle as being fat whiteface (Hereford for you city folk). Of the section of land that they owned in New Mexico there remains 160 acres in the estate.

Maggie came to visit our family in 1939 when I was an infant. We then lived in Gerald, Missouri. My older cousin and brother’s and sister remember her fondly and the stories she told the Parker’s that survived to adulthood had all been in or near the teaching profession. As a whole they were a fine, sober, genteel group of people save one (my opinion). So the sturdy stock from our English genes is still flourishing in the U.S. to this day. Maggie had a constitution of iron. In her old age she would often talk to herself. She was in grief over the loss of her children as her mother had been over the loss of her children. Some say Ann Entwistle suffered from some senility in old age. And some say Margaret Ellen (Maggie) was a bit doty. Around our house you didn’t talk that way. Relatives were and are sacred to my mother and you don’t talk about her relatives even if it is the truth. The Parkers had a quality that I found nonexistent for my cynical ways and that is they seemed fiercely loyal to one another and bonded in away that I have seen in few American families. There wasn’t necessarily any mention of God and church although my grandmother Emma did become a bit of (how can one say fanatic) stern in her view of the world. Everything was from God’s lips to her ears and her truth was the only truth. Many of my generation have followed in her footsteps where others try to have a more balanced view of the world. I don’t know what religion the Entwistles were but the Parkers were known as loyal Democrats and embraced a variety of Christian denominations.

We have become part of the wonderful American fabric. I don’t know if you want the names of Ann’s grandchildren’s spouse or exactly what kind of further information. I am a novice at this. I promised my mother I would research her book “The Curtman Family in America”. I have never given a hoot about genealogy but I love history. I taught Art History and Reformation History in the University for awhile, but decided I didn’t want to do that anymore. You can tell by my typing I didn’t make a living in clerical or secretarial work. The thing you miss most when you retire are the people who make you look good by there everyday tasks. If you want or need other information let me know. this is the start

Second Submittals of Family History Information from James Heady

 

February 13, 2007

I am still searching for information on my family. Are you the Grimshaw Located in Austin?

Some years ago I sent you information of Ann Grimshaw who married a Samuel Entwhistle. They married in Bury and the following year came to the USA. They enter through New Orleans with their infant daughter Mary. I next find them in Dec 1856 in Maries County, Missouri. On the 1860 census Mary is not alive.

(Their son) Thomas was sued for slander and had to pay $1,000.00 dollars in 1864. In this suit it was revealed that Samuel owned a property on Main St., St. Louis, Missouri. Samuel died in 1864. The suit said he was having financial problems. Another refers to his health. No one ever spoke of him so I wondered if he had committed suicide.

I found the cemetery two years ago and had half of it fenced in a gate and name put up. The other half is fighting our efforts. There is an 1885 law in Mo which they can not deny access and he has put a fence through it. He claims we can’t prove it. It is listed as an unnamed cemetery in the Maries Co Cemetery Book. Also it appears on the Highway Department’s maps. I hope to go again in a couple of months if health allows.

I am still having a (difficult) time of finding a comfortable connection to the English Grimshaws. Her wedding certificate said her father was Jonathan Grimshaw a weaver. She spoke of working in the mills when she was young. She was born in 1818 and so many trees have her listed as being born in 1831. Was she born In Oswaldtwissle or was she born at Elton? She did have a Mormon connection. Supposedly her sister Mary married a William P Smith and came to the USA. Ann show(s) a Mormon Baptism in Lancashire but I find nothing that her husband ever embraced that faith.

There was a Jonathan Grimshaw in Jefferson City just 35 miles from where Ann lived. He had made the trek to Utah then returned to Missouri. He did have a son named Jonathan who stayed in Salt Lake. I can not find who Jonathan’s siblings were.

They also have Hannah as another name for her (Ann). In the bible her name is entered as Ann Elizabeth.

Have you had any queries or updates to this line?

Jim Heady in San Antonio

January 14, 2007

I misinformed you. It was Samuel who was sued for slander and lost. It must have been a humdinger to be worth $1,000.00.

You can see Ann accounted well for herself with her testimony.

Ann Elizabeth Grimshaw was born June 10, 1818 (believed to be Church, Oswaldtwissle). Ann died July 9, 1902 is buried at The Red Cemetery in Maries Co.

Samuel and Ann were married July 25, 1849 at Bury, St. Marys, Lancashire, England. The marriage certificates states Ann’s father was Jonathan Grimshaw a weaver. And Samuel’s father was listed as Joseph Greenhalgh a bricklayer. I have yet to discover who his mother might be. Ann made an x and Samuel signed his name in a beautiful script. His occupation was listed as house painter.

They left Liverpool January 29, 1851 and arrived in New Orleans April 7 1951. Their child Mary is listed as an infant which indicates that she was 1 yr old or less. The ship was named the Emma Fields. A letter I received in 1956, states that they came over on a fast Clipper ship.

I do not know if they are taking the 1831 as her christening date but can find no support for that. Is it possible that could have been a baptism in the LDS Church?

Also in reading through web sites several make the assertion that William P Smith was a cousin to the prophet Joseph Smith.

Some sites have William as having plural marriages. Not true. While he had three different wives it was at separate times. His second wife Sarah divorced him. He then married a non Mormon and was excommunicated. I take little comfort in knowing he was reinstated post humously (sic).

Jim Heady

 

Descendant Chart of Samuel and Mary (Grimshaw) Entwistle

The following descendant chart is extracted from the information provided by James Heady.

William Grimshaw (1757 – ) & Jane Hindle (1769 – ). Married 1786.

|–Jonathan Grimshaw & Ann Lazenby. Married 1814

|–|–Jane Grimshaw

|–|–Mary Grimshaw

|–|–William Grimshaw

|–|–Faith Grimshaw

|–|–Alice Grimshaw

|–|–Betty Grimshaw

|–|–James Grimshaw

|–|–Riley Grimshaw

|–|–Margaret Grimshaw

|–|–Henry Grimshaw

|–|–Ann Grimshaw (10 Jun 1818 – 9 Jul 1902, Missouri) & Samuel Entwistle (ca 1820 – ). Married 25 Jul 1850, Bury, Lancashire

|–|–|–Mary Entwistle

|–|–|–Alex Scott Entwistle

|–|–|–John Franklin Entwistle

|–|–|–Thomas Entwistle

|–|–|–Sarah Jane Entwistle

|–|–|–Margaret Ellen (Maggie) Entwistle (2 Oct 1859 – ) & John David Parker (14 Nov 1854 – Dec 1913). Married 23 Dec 1875, Maries County, MO

|–|–|–|–Minnie Ellen Parker (28 Oct 1876 – 24 Jan 1960) & Unk Roberds

|–|–|–|–William Alfred Parker (20 Dec 1878 – 4 Jul 1948) &

|–|–|–|–Addison (Addie or Ad) Parker (21 Aug 1881 – 3 Dec 1961) & Unk Ellis

|–|–|–|–Annie Elizabeth Parker (14 Aug 1884 – 1 Feb 1900) & 

|–|–|–|–Emily (Emma Lee) Parker (14 April 1887 – 25 Nov 1955) & Unk Curtman-Renfrow

|–|–|–|–Leona Parker (19 Mar 1889 – 1 Nov 1891) &

|–|–|–|–Robert Addison Parker (17 Sep 1891 – 26 Sep 1903) & 

|–|–|–|–Joseph Levi Parker (3 Oct 1893 – 27 Apr 1963) & 

|–|–|–|–Henry Monroe Parker (29 Nov 1895 – 13 Jun 1965) &

|–|–|–|–Infant Daughter Parker (30 Sep 1898 – 30 Sep 1898) 

|–|–|–|–John Dorsey Parker (20 Jun 1900 – 24 Jul 1944)

|–|–|–|–Effie Fay Parker (28 Mar 1902 – 12 Nov 1925)

|–|–|–|–Infant Daughter Parker (Jul 1905 – )

Lawsuit Record Involving Ann and Samuel Entwistle

Apparently received by James Heady from Lisa James in October 2006. Lisa apparently was typing the lawsuit from old records she obtained and identified as “Box 6, Bundle 1”. Ann (Grimshaw) Entwistle’s testimony in the lawsuit is indicated in italics…

 

J. L. Smith vs. Wm. Boardman Civil Action (Box 6, Bundle 1)

In the Circuit Court

Maries County

J. L. Smith, Plaintiff

Vs

William Boardman, Defendant

Plaintiff states that on the first day of November, 1860, & prior that, at the county of Maries and state of Missouri, One Samuel Entwistle was there and then in failing circumstances, greatly embarrassed pecuniarily, and was there and then sued for a large amount by divers persons and particularly by one Robert J. Beard;

That afterward to wit, on the 23 day of November 1860, the said Beard recovered judgment against the said Entwistle in the said Maries Circuit Court for the sum of one thousand dollars; that a short time previous to this rendition of the said judgment against the said Entwistle to wit, on the ___ day of ____ 1860, the said Entwistle by his deed of conveyance of that date, a duly certified copy where of is herewith filed and made a part of this petition, transferred all & conveyed until the said defendant the following described real estate situated in the said county of Maries to wit: The East half of the North West quarter & the South West quarter of the North East quarter & the East half of the North East quarter in section thirty three (33). The West half of the North West quarter & the North East quarter of the North West quarter & the North West quarter of the South East quarter in section thirty four (34). The South East quarter of the South West quarter in section twenty eight (28); the South West quarter of the South West quarter in section twenty seven (27). All in Township Forty One (41) Range nine (9) West containing 420 acres.

Plaintiff further states that the conveyance and transfer of said real estate by the said Entwistle to the defendant was contrived and made with the intent to hinder, delay, and defraud the creditors of the said Entwistle of their lawful actions, damages, debts, and demands.

Plaintiff further states that the said conveyance was made without any consideration valuable in law, as against the creditors of the said Entwistle.

Plaintiff further states that subsequent to the rendition of said judgment execution was issued thereon to the sheriff of Maries County and the same was duly levied on the real estate aforesaid as the property of the said Entwistle, and that said sheriff under said execution sold said real estate as the law directed to this plaintiff and made executed and delivered to plaintiff deed therefrom which is herewith filed and made a part hereof; and therefrom plaintiff states that by virtue of his said purchase he acquired the title of the said Entwistle ___ deed to said real estate.

Plaintiff further states that there was a secret understanding made and entered into by and between the said Entwistle and the defendant at the time of the execution of the said deed first aforesaid whereby the said defendant should hold the legal title to the said real estate in trust and for the use and benefit of the said Entwistle, in whom remained the equitable title thereto.

Plaintiff charges that the said conveyance of said real estate from said Entwistle to the defendant was fraudulent and void as to this plaintiff.

Plaintiff thereupon prays this honorable court upon the hearing of this cause, that it will order adjudge and decree that the said deed from the said Entwistle to the defendant for said real estate be canceled, annulled, set aside and held for naught & that the pretended title of the defendant to said real estate be declared forever divested from defendant and vested in the plaintiff, his heirs, and assigns forever, and for such other and further relief as in equity and good conscience may serve meet & transfer.

Plaintiff by leave of the court first had and obtained for that purpose files the forgoing as his amended and ____ ____ petition in the above _____ cause.

McCard Mueller ??? for Plaintiff

In the Circuit Court of

Maries County

Jackson L. Smith, Plaintiff

Against

William Boardman, Defendant

Be it remember that as the May Term 870 (1870?) of the Circuit Court of Maries County the above cause came on for hearing before the court, upon the petition as follows (here insert it).

And the answer of defendant as follows (here insert it – Whereupon the plaintiff offered in evidence a sheriff’s deed to the land in controversy as follows (here insert it),___ certificates endorsed, which being objected to by defendant on the ground that it did not appear from the face of said deed or otherwise, that the parts making said deed was the late sheriff of Maries County, nor that he made the ____ before his term of office expired, nor that he had failed to make and acknowledge a deed before the expiration of his term of office, nor any facts that would authorize the execution of a deed by him as late sheriff of Maries county, which objection being overruled by the court, the defendant then and there duly excepted.

Plaintiff then introduced as a witness Mrs. Ann Entwistle, who testified as follows: I am the widow of Samuel Entwistle deceased. There was no administrators on my husband’s estate. He had at the time of his death 2 or 3 head of horses, a couple of cows and a few yearlings. At the time of the rendition of the judgment of Beard against him in 1860 he had the property I have named. He had land – there was a mortgage on it in favor?? Of Jno B Evans for $200 – this $200 was paid to Mr. Evans by Mr. Entwistle. I joined in a deed of conveyance of this land to the defendant Boardman. We then owed Evan’s mortgage. I talked with Wm. Boardman about the land after the death of my husband, which took place May 10, 1864. It was arranged that I should pay the taxes to Mr. Boardman and he gave me a receipt. My husband paid the taxes on the land after the execution of the deed to the time of his death, and I continued to do so. I understood from both my husband and Mr. Boardman, of the suit between plff and defendant was decided for defendant, that the land was to belong to me. Before my husband’s death Mr. Boardman came to our house, and my husband said to defendant, we understand this matter, but these little children of mine do not, and in case of my death I ought to now have a deed, and Mr. Boardman answered certainly you shall have a deed. Mr. Boardman told me that when this suit between Smith and him was decided, he would convey the property to me. Said I must raise the money to pay the costs of this suit and attorney’s fees amounting to $300. The deed was made to Boardman after the commencement of the suit of slander by Beard against my husband for a large amount of money.

I do not know that my husband ever received any money or property from Boardman as a consideration for the deed. The personal property mentioned in the deed was not delivered to Mr. Boardman. The Jack died – two steers, by my directing??, were sold by Mr. Boardman to John Felker and I got the money. Defendant paid it to me after deducting taxes. Mr. Boardman sold rails off of the place to R. W. Anderson and paid me the money, except amount retained for costs and taxes on land. My husband continued to live on the land conveyed to Boardman up to the time of his death and I have lived there since. Have paid no rent – After the sale of the land, we moved from the place where we were then living, on to another part of the land. My husband took a mare to St. Louis and sold her and $60 of the money was paid to Jno B. Evans on his mortgage – I only know this from what my husband told me. My husband paid off the note to Evans, and I got it. The mare was sold in St. Louis by Mr. Evans. I have paid all the taxes that have been demanded of me. I have paid $20 in all. Have never paid any costs or attorney’s fees. Prior to the time we moved there was a man named Katring had lived on part of the land and in the house on the place we moved into – Mr. Boardman requested him to move. It is two years last fall since Mr. Boardman asked me to raise money to pay costs and attorney’s fees – which I promised to do if defendant would make me deed to the land as he promised. My husband kept all the property, real and personal, mentioned in this deed during his life and the part understood?? Of, I have kept since his death in my possession. Mr. Boardman sold to John Felker since my husband’s death two steers for which the deed we given and _____ to me ___ ___ money by paying the taxes?? With the money on the land in this ___ with all of the money, except twelve dollars he paid me. Boardman said to me\ since the death of my husband that the land was in fact my husband’s and he would convey it to me by deed as soon as he succeeded in defeating the suit of Smith Plff against him for land but that I must pay the expenses of suit.

All of the evidence of the witness Mrs. Entwistle was objected to for the reasons that Samuel Entwistle, one of the parties to the original contract and cause of action was dead – because she could not be allowed to testify as to any acts, transactions, or declarations of her husband during ____ and because it is not competent for her to contradict, or alter the _____ in the deed of herself and husband to Boardman and to show that there was a secret agreement that the land was the held in trust by Boardman for the benefit of herself or husband – which objection was overruled by the court as to all of said evidence except that part relating to the consideration of the deed to Boardman, and to which ruling of the court, the defendant duly excepted.

R. P. Bathrick, for plaintiff, testified as follows: Mr. Boardman told me he had the land and the Beard judgment could not take it from him. We were talking about the land he got from Entwistle – never heard him and Entwistle say anything about the land when they were together. We were talking about the judgment obtained by Beard against Entwistle in a suit for slander. He said the land was really Entwistle’s – that the Beard judgment could not reach it for it was in his own name.

Plaintiff here closes his case and defendant introduced as a witness, John B. Evans, who testified as follows: I reside in St. Louis – am a lawyer – had been before the execution of deed by Entwistle to Boardman, attending to business for both of them – I am a brother-in-law to Boardman. The deed was written in my office in St. Louis by my nephew, and under my direction. The consideration of the deed was fifteen hundred dollars – two hundred of it was paid cash, and three notes given for the balance, all dated Jan. 23, 1860. One for $500 payable two years after date – one for $300 payable three years after date and one for $280 payable four years after date; all ____ six per cent interest, and in addition to this, Mr. Boardman assured the payment of the not for $200, which Entwistle owed me, and which was secured by a mortgage on this land. Defendant then offered in evidence a receipt of Entwistle as follows: (here copy receipt) – also note of Entwistle to Jno B. Evans as follows (here copy note with endorsement therein as follows (copy endorsement on note) also note of Entwistle to Wm. Boardman for $60 as follows (here copy same). Witness further stated that the note of Entwistle to Boardman for $60 offered in evidence was taken by Entwistle as part of the cash payment of two hundred dollars on the land – and that the balance was paid by Boardman in cash – and that the note for $500 given by Boardman in payment of the land was paid by Boardman to Entwistle, and that the note for two hundred dollars for which witness held a mortgage on the land and which was assumed by Boardman, was paid by him, and that the note offered in evidence for $200 of Entwistle to witness, was the same not assumed and paid by Boardman, and was then endorsed by witness to him. The other two notes given by Boardman to Entwistle were endorsed in my office in St. Louis to Mr. David O’Hughes, which defendant knew at the time. Don’t know what became of them afterwards, or whether they were ever paid by Boardman or not – But I think not.

On cross examination the witness states that he was at Mr. Boardman’s house in the latter part of the fall of 1859 – came to see his sister, Mrs. Boardman, wife of defendant. There was a slander suit then pending in the circuit court of Maries County between Robert J. Beard and Samuel Entwistle. I attended to taking depositions for Mr. Entwistle in St. Louis – Don’t think I wrote the answer in that case – may have done so – I was not employed by Entwistle to come to Maries County and attend to this case and did not come for that purpose. I did not appear in the case – don’t remember that I signed the answer – I was at the Maries Circuit Court while in Maries County – Think Muir & Draffer were attorneys for Entwistle. It was not on account of the slander suit that the conveyance was made by Entwistle – I only held one note for $200 on Entwistle. Witness is here shown another note in his favor on Entwistle for $200, which is offered in evidence by plaintiff and is as follows (here copy note) with assignment on the bank of the same as follows (here copy assignment) and continues – I can’t explain how I came to hold two notes on Entwistle for $200 of same date – one seems to be a copy of the other – The note shown me now, by plaintiff on Entwistle is the original note for which I held a mortgage on Entwistle’s land and was paid by Boardman. Think this note was in Bank – think the other note, for $200, which I endorsed to Boardman was a copy of this – canot explain how I held both notes or how it is defendant still holds this one shown by defendant as evidence, except that Entwistle was an illiterate man, and knew very little about business and was in the habit of losing his papers – think there was no other note given at same time the $200 not was given me by Entwistle. The consideration of this note was mostly cash – don’t remember any other note given at the same time – Entwistle owned leasehold property on Main Street in St. Louis. I collected the rents for him, and paid his ground rent and for repairs. I was examining witnesses for him 14 or 15 days in St. Louis. May have charged him for filing answer in slander suit – don’t remember what I charged him – I had cases for him touching his leasehold property. I _____ advanced him money – don’t think he owed me anything else at the time he gave me the mortgage on his land – I sold the mare brought to St. Louis by Entwistle.

Plaintiff in rebuttal withdrew: James Shockley, who testified as follows– I know David O’Hughes. He lived at Mr. Boardman’s in Maries County in 1860. I knew him until February 1862. He and I were in the Southern army together at Springfield. He made his home at Boardman’s. Did not appear to be doing anything. Had no visible property – don’t know whether he had any invisible property or not.

Mrs. Entwistle recalled by plaintiff testified as follows: David O’Hughes came to my house and wanted my husband to assign to him the notes given by Boardman to my husband. Mr. Entwistle assigned the notes to him after a great deal of ______. Hughes said we could not go through with the business unless the notes were assigned – could not show that the land was paid for. That might have been the $500 note – perhaps there were two of them. Hughes told my husband he was going to leave the notes with Mrs. Boardman. This was after Hughes came up to Maries County to live. Hughes did not say he was going to pay anything for the notes. Don’t know whether he left the notes with Mrs. Boardman or not – my understanding was that she had the notes. Don’t know whether they were paid. Last time I saw Hughes he was going to Bonnot’s Station with Mr. Boardman.

Now here it appears some pages out of order, or extra pages, or possibly this case came before a judge more than once. I am typing them up as I come to them in the order they are stapled together – which may be jumbled. [Typist’s note]

As follows (here copy) and says that he signed the same – and they are offered in evidence by plaintiff – also two _______ receipts (here insert them). I can’t say on what account this money was paid as Entwistle then owed me nothing on note – he may have owed me for collecting his rents in St. Louis and for which receipts were given. No note for $500 given by Boardman to Entwistle was endorsed at date of this execution in my office to David O Hughes. (receipts of David OHuges insert here)

Plff shows witness account attested by D. O’Hughes which witness recognizes as a statement made and rendered by him to Entwistle (here insert statement of D OHughes ______ correctly)

Insert receipt of “ D Desseaux” for taking ________ as follows: (Here insert)

Think I sent him with the mare to Wiles Stable, with a note to Wiles to sell the mare on my account – I received the money for the mare and after deducting expenses of sale, paid the balance to Mr. Boardman. Don’t remember that I retained $60 of the amount. I received no money from Entwistle on account of the $200 note. David O Hughes to whom the notes of Boardman were endorsed is a nephew of mine. He was 24 or 25 years old at the time. The notes were made in my office in St. Louis – and delivered to Entwistle at that time. Hughes attended to business for Entwistle in collecting rents, after I gave up his business, and this is as far as I know was the consideration for the endorsement of the notes to him by Entwistle. Hughes afterwards went South and I don’t know what became of him – Have not, seen, or heard of him since – Don’t know that he went from St. Louis to Boardman’s – and was not aware of his intentions to go there. Boardman never told me knew where these notes were, nor did Mrs. Boardman; he was a nephew of Mrs. Boardman. Witness is shown by plaintiff, receipt for $75 as follows (here copy) also note as follows (here copy) and account.

Defendant objected to all evidence of acts or declarations of Hughes, on the ground that they were not shown to have been in presence of or with knowledge or consent of Boardman – and the objection being overruled defendant duly excepted.

Joseph Mosby, for Plff stated that he had read the answer of defendant Boardman in Maries Circuit Court, as garnishee on execution on the judgment in favor of Robert Beard and that Boardman alleged therein that the notes given to Entwistle for purchase of land had been assigned to other persons and he did not know to whom, and that Boardman upon this answer was discharged as garnishee – the slander suit was commenced by Beard in the Fall of 1859.

This was all the evidence in the cause _____ . Defendant was then ______ instructions as follows (here copy) being refused by the court Defendant duly accepted. The court thereupon rendered a decree for Plaintiff as follows (here copy decree)

Defendant afterwards filed his notion to set aside the finding and decree of the court and for a new hearing as follows (copy, motion) which being overruled by the court the defendant duly accepted and tendered to the court this his bill of exceptions and prays that the same may be allowed, signed and sealed by the court & made a part of the record, which is done accordingly.

D Gale Jucker (???)

R. P. Bathrick, for plaintiff testified as follows: Mr. Boardman told me he had the land and the Beard judgment could not take it from him. We were talking about the land he got from Entwistle – Never heard him and Entwistle say anything about the land when they were together. We were talking about the judgment obtained by Beard against Entwistle in a suit for slander. He said the land was really Entwistle’s – ____ the Beard judgment could not reach it for it was in his own name.

Plaintiff here closed his case and defendant introduced as a witness John B. Evans who testified as follows: I reside in St. Louis – am a lawyer – had been efore the execution of deed by Entwistle to Boardman, attending to business for both of them. I am a brother-in-law to Boardman. The deed was written in my office in St. Louis by my nephew, and under my direction. The consideration of the deed was fifteen hundred dollars – two hundred of it was paid cash, and three notes given for the balance, all dated Jan 23, 1860– one for $500 payable two years after date – one for $300 payable three years after date andn one for $280 payable four years after date, all bearing six per cent interest, and in addition to this, Mr. Boardman assumed the payment of the note for $200, which Entwistle owed me, and which was secured by a mortgage on this land. Defendant then offered in evidence a receipt of Entwistle as follows (here copy receipt) – also note of Entwistle to Jno B Evans as follows (here copy note) with endorsement thereon as follows (copy endorsement on note) also note of Entwistle to Wm Boardman for $60 as follows (here copy same) Witness further states that the note of Entwistle to Boardman for $60 – offered in evidence was taken by Entwistle as part of the cash payment of two hundred dollars on the land and that the balance was paid by Boardman in cash – and that the note for $500 given by Boardman to Entwistle, and that the note for two hundred dolloars for which witness held a mortgage on the land and which was assumed by Boardman, was paid by him, and that the note offered in evidence for $200 of Entwistle to witness, was the same note assumed and paid by Boardman and was then endorsed by witness to him. The other two notes by Boardman to Entwistle, were endorsed in my office in St. Louis to one David OHughes, which defendant knew at the time. Don’t know what became of them afterwards, or whether they were ever paid by Boardman or not. – But I think not.

On cross examination the witness states that he was at Mr. Boardman’s house in the latter part of the Fall of 1859 – came to see his sister, Mrs. Boardman, wife of defendant. There was a sland suit then pending in the Circuit of Maries County between Robert J. Beard and Samuel Entwistle. I attended to taking depositions for Mr. Entwistle in St. Louis. Don’t think I wrote the answer in that case – may have done so – I was not employed by Entwistle to come to Maries County and attend to this case, and did not come for that purpose. I did not appear in the case – don’t remember that I signed the answer. I was at the Maries Circuit Court while in Maries County– Think Muir & Draffer were attorneys for Entwistle. It was not on account of the sland suit that the conveyance was made by Entwistle – I only held one note for $200 on Entwistle. Witness is here shown another note in his favor on Entwistle for $200 which is offered in evidence by plaintiff and is as follows (here copy note) with assignment on the back of the same as follows (here copy assignment) and continues – I can’t explain how I came to hold two notes on Entwistle for $200 of same date – one seems to be a copy of the other – The note shown me now by plaintiff on Entwistle is the original note for which I held a mortgage on Entwistle’s land, and was paid by Boardman. This this note was in Bank – think the other note for $200, which I endorsed to Boardman was a copy of this – can’t explain how I held both notes, or how it is defendant still holds this one shown by defendant as evidence, except that Entwistle was an illiterate man, and knew very little about business and was in the habit of losing his papers – think there was no other note given at same time the $200 note was given me by Entwistle. The consideration of this note was mostly cash – Don’t remember any other note given at the same time. Entwistle owned leasehold property on Main Street in St. Louis. I collected the rents for him, and paid his ground rent and for repairs. I was examining witnesses for him 14 or 15 days in St. Louis – May have charged him for filing answer in slander suit – don’t remember what I charged him – I had cases for him touching his leasehold property. I ______ advanced him money – don’t think he owed me anything else at the time he gave me the mortgage on his land. I sold the mare brought to St. Louis by Entwistle.

In the Maries Circuit Court

May Term 1870

J. L. Smith, Plaintiff

Against

William Boardman,defendant

And now comes the said defendant and moves the court to set aside the finding and decree of the court rendered in the above entitled cause and grant him a new hearing for reasons following to wit:

1. Because the court permitted the introduction of illegal and incompetent evidence in the part of the Plaintiff.

2. Because the finding and decree of the court is against the law and the evidence.

3. Because the decree of the court is not authorized or supported by the evidence and contrary to equity and good conscience.

4. Because the court refused all the instructions asked by the defendant.

Lay Belch X

Ag. Seay for defendant

In the Circuit Court

Maries County

J. L. Smith, Plff

VS

Wm. Boardman, Defendant

Now comes plaintiff and moves the court strike from its files a paper filed in the above entitled cause and _______ thereon an answer for reason following to wit:

Because said paper _______ to be are _____ was not filed ______ _____ _______ by ____ or ____ scribed by the order of the court in the case.

McCard for Plff.

In the Maries Circuit Court

November term 1869

J. L. Smith, Plaintiff

Against

William Boardman, Deft

The defendant William Boardman by leave of court first had for answer to the plaintiff’s petition says as to whether on the first day of November 1860 one Samuel Entwistle was pecunairily embarrassed or in failing circumstances or was sued by one Robert J. Beard and others or that said Robert J. Beard on the 23rd day of November 1860 in the Maries Circuit Court obtained a judgment against said Entwistle. Defendant has no knowledge or information sufficient to form a belief and avers?? That if said allegations are true the ought not in any way to effect the rights of this defendant.

Defendant admits that he purchased certain real estate from said Entwistle about the time alleged and that said Entwistle made, executed and delivered to him a good warrantee deed for the same and that he paid a good and valuable consideration in law for the same but emphatically denies said purchase and sale was made to hinder, delay, or defeat the creditors of said Entwistle and that this defendant paid a valuable consideration for said land without any knowledge on the part of this defendant of any pecuniary embarrassment or fraudulent intent of said Entwistle and denies such embarrassment or fraudulent intent existed and deft avers??

That at the time of the purchase and sale aforesaid there was no judgments, liens, or other incumbrances on said lands.

As to whether there was ever any sale, judgment, execution of levy by the sheriff on purchase by the plaintiff of said lands as alleged, deft has no knowledge or information to form a belief.

Defendant denies that Plaintiff acquired any title in law or equity to said land by virture of the sale alleged if there ever was any secret understanding by and between the said Entwistle and defendant that the defendant would purchase for the benefit of said Entwistle or to defraud his creditors as alleged in Plaintiff’s petition or otherwise.

Denies that said conveyance from said Entwistle to said defendant was or is fraudulent but avers?? That it was bona-fide and for a valuable consideration and now having fully answered asks to be discharged with his reasonable costs in this behalf.

Lay Belch & Seay, Attys.

J. L. Smith, plaintiff

Against

William Boardman, defendant

This cause ______ in to be heard before the court upon the petition answer and all and singular item proofs ______ sum heard and by the court – here freely understood. It doth find that in this first day of November 1860, and ___ thereto, that one Samuel Entwistle was in failing circumstances, greatly embarrassed pecuniary and was then sued for a large amount of money and was indebted among others Robert J. Beard: that afterwards on the 23rd day of November, 1860, said beard recovered judgment against said Entwistle in the Circuit Court of Maries County for the sum of One thousand dollars: that previous to the ________ of said judgment on the 23rd day of January 1860, the said Entwistle by his deed of conveyance of that date, transferred and conveyed unto the defendant the following described real estate situated in the county of Maries and state of Missouri, to wit:

The East half of the north west quarter also the south west quarter of the north east quarter also the east half of the north east quarter in section thirty three(33) also the west half of the north west quarter also the north east quarter of the north west quarter also the north west quarter of the south east quarter in section thirty four (34) also the south east quarter of the south west quarter in section twenty eight (28) also the south west quarter of the south west quarter in section twenty seven (27) all in township forty one (41) and range nine (9) west containing four hundred and twenty acres more or less.

That the said transfer and conveyance of said real estate by said Entwistle to defendant was contrived and made with with the interest to hinder, delay and defraud the creditors of said Entwistle of their lawful actions, debts, damages and demands. That there was no valueable consideration passed from said Boardman to said Entwistle for said conveyance of said real estate as against the creditors of said Entwistle that after the rendition of said judgment and execution issued thereon out of the clerk’s office of said Maries Circuit Court, directed to the sheriff of the county of Maries aforesaid, who levied the same on said real estate as _____ property of said Entwistle and that said sheriff afterwards at the may term of 1861 of the said court sold the acreage at public _____ under said executions and levy according to the requirements of the statutes in such case made and moved, to the plaintinff and executed and delivered to plaintiff a sheriff’s deed therefore; that plaintiff by said purchase of said real estate thereby acquired the title and interest of said Entwistle in said real estate; that there was prior to the making of said deed from said Entwistle to the defendant a secret understanding made and entered into by and between said Entwistle and Boardman whereby the said Boardman was to take and hold the legal title to the said real estate in trust for the use and benefit of said Entwistle and that the equitable till??? And interest of said Entwistle _______ in said real estate.

The court further finds that the said conveyance of said real estate by said Entwistle to defendant was fraudulent as to the said

Beard the plaintiff.

It is thereupon ordered adjudged and decreed by the court that the said ______ deed of conveyance from the said Samuel Entwistle to the said defendant of the real estate herein before described and which said deed is recorded in the recorders office of the said county of Maries in Book C? Pages 421, 422, and 423, and the same is hereby declared canceled, annulled, setaside and held for naught and the pretended title of the said defendant therein is declared forever divested from defendant and forever vested in the plaintiff, his heirs and assigns.

It is further ordered that the plaintiff have and recover of defendant his costs and expenses in his behalf paid out and expended and have there of execution.

Deed thereof; that plaintiff by said purchase of said real estate thereby acquired the title and interest of said Entwistle in said real estate; that there was

 

Connection to Mary (Grimshaw) Smith, Mormon Immigrant to Utah

Ann Grimshaw was the younger sister of Mary Grimshaw, wife of Joseph Smith (different one from the Mormon martyr), who migrated to Salt Lake City, Utah as Mormon immigrants. They are a subject of a companion webpage on this website.

Information on Ann and Samuel Entwistle from Ardis Parshall

Ardis Parshall provided a very interesting article in January 2009 on the voyage of Ann and Samuel to America, which was published in the Mormon newspaper, “Millenial Star”, in 1851. Ardis’ e-mail is shown below.

 

To: thomas.w@grimshaw.com

Subject: Ann Grimshaw m. Samuel Entwistle

Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 18:47:59 -0500

Hello —

I ran across your Grimshaw website while googling to find out what had become of Samuel Entwistle and his wife Ann Grimshaw. I have no family connection, but I do a lot of Mormon history research, which prompted my search.

Samuel and Ann emigrated to the U.S. as Mormon converts; I’m stilling trying to find out why they didn’t make it all the way to Utah. Perhaps it was just the need to stop at St. Louis to earn money for the rest of their migration, followed by a gradual drift away from Mormonism. In any case, they show up in the “Millennial Star,” the Mormon newspaper published at Liverpool, England, on July 1, 1851. I thought perhaps someone using your website would like this little bit of detail of their emigration and the birth of their son:

ARRIVAL OF THE “ELLEN MARIA” AT NEW ORLEANS

By letter from Elder G.D. Watt, dated St.Louis, April 17th, we learn that the _Ellen Maria_ arrived at New Orleans on the 6th of April, having made the voyage in 63 days.

She experienced a strong gale of wind on the fifth of February, but it abated on the sixth, and in a few days afterwards the Saints had become accustomed to sea life, and were free from sickness. On the 11th she cleared the Irish sea, where it is not uncommon for vessels to be detained twenty or thirty days. The remainder of the voyage was as pleasant as sea voyages generally.

Meetings were held every sabbath, and also during the week; at which Elder Pratt addressed the Saints and others present, on the glories of our holy religion, “treating of the dealings of God with mankind in former times, and upon what he will do in the latter times, quoting from the Prophets in the written word, and opening the future to view, until the Saints felt like leaping for joy, and shouting aloud, because of their privilege to live in these days, when the power and majesty of God are, and shall be, displayed in so many marvellous ways.”

On the 9th of April, most of the company left New Orleans for St. Louis, on the _Alex. Scot_, one of the largest boats on the river, and arrived there on the 16th.

A sorrowful circumstance transpired in going up the river. … [a woman attempting to draw up water in a bucket was pulled from the deck and drowned. Then follows a list of marriages, births, and deaths occurring during the trip, including:]

The Births Were: — …

A. Entwistle, of a son, April 9, named Alex Scot …

The thanks of the company are presented to Elder W.C. Dunbar for the services he rendered them during the time the vessel lay in dock, previous to sailling from Liverpool.

That’s all. I thought that if Alex Scott Entwistle had any descendants who found your website, they would be interested in knowing that he was named after the steamboat that took the emigrants upriver from New Orleans. I would be pleased to have you include my email address if you post this on your website, in case anyone can help me learn more about this family and their reasons for staying at St. Louis rather than completing the overland migration to Utah.

Best —

Ardis Parshall

Salt Lake City

AEParshall@aol.com

 

References

1Author

2Author

Home Page

Webpage posted April 2004. Updated February 2007 with reorganization and addition of supplemental information from James Heady. Updated January 2009 with information on the Entwistle’s voyage to the U.S. from Ardis Parshall.