Grimshaws in the Prestwich Area

As Described by David Grimshaw, a Descendant

William Grimshaw, “Gramophone King”
of parks in the Manchester region, in about 1905

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A major line of Grimshaws in Lancashire was established in Prestwich, northwest of Manchester, apparently in the 1600s or earlier. Readily available records indicate that the earliest Grimshaw recorded in Prestwich was a John Grimshaw, who died in 1671. Three Grimshaws — John, James and George — were likely the sons of John and started families in Prestwich in about the same timeframe around 1680. All three are recorded as living on Rooden Lane. John Grimshaw married Alice Crompton, and James Grimshaw married Maria Crompton.

David Grimshaw, a descendant of the Grimshaws in the Prestwich area, has provided a descendant chart that goes back to a George Grimshaw who married Margaret (last name unknown). Their oldest children, Thomas and Job Grimshaw, were born in 1821 and 1824, respectively, so they were probably born in about 1800.

William Grimshaw, David’s great-grandfather, was known as the “Gramophone King” of Heaton Park and other parks in the Manchester region. William played the gramophone in public in about 1909, during the earliest period of commercial sound recording, which drew large crowds of up to 40,000. William owned a bicycle shop when he began selling gramphones. This shop has evolved into the present-day  Grimshaws Vauxhall, an auto dealership in Prestwich. Alan Grimshaw, like David Grimshaw, is a descendant of William and is now the managing director of Grimshaws Vauxhall.

Contents

Webpage Credits

Conjectures on Earliest Grimshaw Family Lines in Prestwich

George and Margaret Grimshaw Descendant Information

Where Is Prestwich in Relation to Manchester?

Background Information on Prestwich from Wikipedia

Photo and Image from David Grimshaw

William Grimshaw, Gramophone King

The Gramophone King as Described in “Surprising Lancashire”

Additional Gramophone King Photos from David Grimshaw

Grimshaws Vauxhall, an Auto Dealership in Prestwich

Interesting Grimshaw Anecdote from the “Daily Mirror”

Is Francis Grimshaw, Apparent Emigrant to America, Descended from the Prestwich Grimshaws?

Edward Grimshaw, Immigrant to America, with Ancestors in Prestwich

References

Webpage Credits

Thanks go to David Grimshaw for providing the contributions of images and information that have made this webpage possible.

Conjectures on Earliest Grimshaw Family Lines in Prestwich

Records on the LDS FamilySearch and the Prestwich Parish websites have been assembled for the Grimshaw families in the Prestwich area. The websites can be found at:

Parish of Prestwich: http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/Prestwich/ 

LDS FamilySearch: http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp 

The assembled records of the earliest Grimshaws in Prestwich are tabulated below; interpretations and conjectures regarding these records are provided below the table.

 

Yr

Rec

First Name

Date

Spouse

Additional Information

Source

1671

Bur

John

25 Feb 1671



LDS

1676

Mar

Johanes

26 Mar 1676

 

Crompton

Johanes Grimshaw et Alicia Crompton

 

PP

1677

Mar

James

3 Jun 1677

Crompton

James Grimshaw Maria Crompton

 

LDS

1681

Bur

Eliz:

11 Mar 1681

 


Eliz: fa. James Grimshaw de Rooden Lane

 

PP

1682

Bap

Elizabeth

14 Apr 1682


Elizabeth fa. John Grimshaw de Rooden

 

PP

1682

Bap

Mary

23 Apr 1682


Mary fa. George Grimshaw de Rooden

 

PP

1684

Bap

Alice

11 Jan 1684


Alice fa. George Grimshaw

 

PP

1684

Bap

Alice

8 Mar 1684


Alice fa. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1685

Mar

Mary

9 Aug 1685

 

Hilton

Andrew Hilton et Mary Grimshaw

 

PP

1686

Bur

James

31 Aug 1686

 


James Grimshaw de Rooden lane

 

PP

1687

Bap

Ann

23 Oct 1687


Ann fa. George Grimshaw

 

PP

1688

Bap

Ann

29 May 1688


Ann fa. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1688

Bur

James

13 May 1688

 


James f. George Grimshaw

 

PP

1690

Bap

Sarah

27 Jul 1690


Sarah fa. George Grimshaw

 

PP

1691

Bap

William

14 Apr 1691


William f. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1691

Bur

William

5 Nov 1691

 


William f. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1693

Bap

George

21 May 1693


George f. George Grimshaw

 

PP

1693

Bap

James

22 Aug 1693


James f. John Grimshaw, Whitefield

 

PP

1693

Bur

James

25 Dec 1693

 


James f. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1696

Bap

Job

16 Apr 1696


Job f. John Grimshaw de Whitefield

 

PP

1697

Mar

Margaret

20 Apr 1697

 

Heywood

James Heywood Margaret Grimshaw

 

PP

1700

Bap

Phebe

13 Oct 1700


Phebe fa. John Grimshaw

 

PP

1702

Mar

Eliz:

17 Nov 1702

 

Fallows

James Fallows Eliz: Grimshaw

 

PP

1703

Mar

Mary

6 Jan 1703

 

Oldham

Benoni Oldham Mary Grimshaw

 

PP

1704

Bap

Alice

27 Dec 1704


Alice fa. John Grimshaw de Whitefield

 

PP

1704

Bap

George

28 Jan 1704


George f. Job Grimshaw de Tatlow

 

PP

1704

Mar

John

1 Feb 1704

 

Chapman

John Grimshaw Mary Chapman

 

PP

1705

Bur

Anne

4 Feb 1705

 


Anne fa. Johannis Grimshaw d’Whitefield

 

PP

1705

Bur

Alice

26 Apr 1705

 


Alice uxr John Grimsahaw de Whitefield

 

PP

1707

Mar

Alice

24 Jun 1707

 

Fallows

John Fallows Alice Grimshaw

 

PP

1707

Bur

Mary

15 Mar 1707

 


Mary uxor Joannis Grimshaw d’Radclif bridge

 

PP

1708

Bap

Henry

20 Jun 1708


Henry s. of Job Grimshaw of Chetham Hill

 

PP

1708

Bur

John

13 Apr 1708

 


John Grimshaw d’Whitefield Innkeeper

 

PP

1709

Bap

Thomas

24 Aug 1709


Thomas s. of Sarah Grimshaw of Rooden lane

 

PP

1709

Bur

George

12 Apr 1709

 


George Grimshaw of Rooden Lane Sexton

 

PP

1710

Bap

Josiah

7 Nov 1710


Josiah s. of Job Grimshaw of Chetham

 

PP

1711

Bap

Ellin

14 Nov 1711


Ellin d. of John Grimshaw of Radcliffe bridge

 

PP

1711

Mar

Sarah

4 Dec 1711

 

Eckersley

Thomas Eckersley Sarah Grimshaw

 

PP

1711

Bur

Mary

18 Jan 1711

 


Mary Grimshaw of Rooden lane widow

 

PP

1712

Mar

Elizabeth

17 Jun 1712

 

Kay

Thomas Kay Elizabeth Grimshaw

 

PP

1718

Bap

James

9 Oct 1718


Anne Grimshaw & Thomas Scholes

 

LDS

1723

Bap

George

30 Jan 1723


George Grimshaw

 

PP

1723

Bur

Mary

Apr 1723


nonconformist register record

 

PP

1725

Mar

George

31 Aug 1725

Kay

George Grimshaw Anne Kay

 

LDS

1725

Bap

George

24 Apr 1725


George Grimshaw & Sarah

 

LDS

1725

Bap

James

8 Feb 1725


George Grimshaw Y Sarah

 

PP

1745

Bap

John

15 Apr 1745


Mary Grimshaw & Thomas Fallows

 

LDS

1751

Mar

James

28 May 1751

Horsefield

James Grimshaw Mary Horsefield

 

LDS

1752

Bap

James

21 Jun 1752


Mary Grimshaw

 

PP

1756

Mar

George

4 Feb 1756

Holme

George Grimshaw Betty Holme

 

LDS

1756

Bap

James

31 Mar 1756


James Grimshaw & Mary

 

LDS

1758

Bap

George

9 Mar 1758


James Grimshaw & Mary

 

LDS

1759

Bap

George

11 Mar 1759


John Grimshaw & Mgt

 

LDS

1761

Bap

George

18 Mar 1761


John Grimshaw & Mgt

 

LDS

1761

Mar

Martha

12 Nov 1761

Ogden

Richard Ogden Martha Grimshaw

 

PP

1762

Mar

Alice

29 J7l 1762

Farrer

Charles Farrer Alice Grimshaw

 

PP

1765

Mar

George

19 Feb 1765

Darbyshire

George Grimshaw Lydia Darbyshire

 

PP

1766

Mar

James

24 Jun 1766

Hartley

James Grimshaw Betty Hartley

 

PP

1767

Bap

James

8 Feb 1767


James Grimshaw & Betty

 

LDS

1769

Mar

Alice

23 Oct 1769

Royle

Henry Royle Alice Grimshaw

 

PP

1769

Mar

George

28 Mar 1769

Berry

George Grimshaw Marry Berry

 

PP

1769

Mar

Samuel

12 Sep 1769

Bridge

Samuel Grimshaw Martha Bridge

 

PP

1771

Mar

Ann

5 Nov 1771

Collinscock

James Collinscock Ann Grimshaw

 

PP

1772

Bap

George

22 Mar 1772


George Grimshaw & Mary

 

LDS

1773

Mar

Job

21 Oct 1773

Heywood

Job Grimshaw Ann Heywood

 

PP

1774

Mar

John

15 May 1774

Yates

John Grimshaw Mary Yates

 

LDS

1777

Bap

John

27 Jul 1777


John Grimshaw & Mary Yates

 

LDS

1778

Mar

John

13 Sep 1778

Deavers

John Grimshaw Mary Deavers

 

LDS

1787

Bap

James

30 Aug 1787


Nicholas Grimshaw & Susan

 

LDS

1788

Mar

James

3 Jan 1788

Green

James Grimshaw Martha Green

 

LDS

1790

Bap

John

3 Oct 1790


Samuel Grimshaw & Alice

 

LDS

1790

Mar

George

10 Nov 1790

Parr

George Grimshaw Elizabeth Parr

 

LDS

1790

Mar

James

4 Jan 1790

Hardy

James Grimshaw Mgt Hardy

 

LDS

1793

Bap

James

14 Jul 1793


Elizabeth Grimshaw & George Taylor

 

LDS

1793

Nup

George

29 Sep 1793


Samuel Grimshaw & Alice Grimshaw

 

PP

1797

Bap

James

12 Feb 1797


Thomas Grimshaw & Alice Grimshaw

 

LDS

1813

Bap

George

7 Nov 1813


Hugh Grimshaw & Mary

 

LDS

1813

Bap

George

7 Nov 1813



PP

1815

Bap

Edward

9 Jul 1815



PP

1815

Bap

Esther

1 Oct 1815



PP

1817

Bap

Edward

3 Apr 1817



PP

1818

Bap

Henry

5 Apr 1818



PP

1818

Bap

Mary

23 Aug 1818



PP

1819

Bap

Hugh

17 Oct 1819



PP

1819

Bap

James

3 Oct 1819



PP

1819

Bap

Mary

31 Jan 1819



PP

1819

Bap

Mary

19 Sep 1819



PP

1820

Bap

John

3 Sep 1820



PP

1821

Bap

Hiram

26 Aug 1821



PP

1821

Bap

Thomas

4 Nov 1821



PP

1822

Bap

Mary Ann

4 Aug 1822



PP

1822

Bap

William

17 Mar 1822



PP

1823

Bap

Samuel

3 Aug 1823



PP

1824

Bap

Ann

2 May 1824



PP

1824

Bap

Job

22 Feb 1824



PP

1824

Bap

Sarah

2 May 1824



PP

1824

Bap

Thomas

20 Jun 1824



PP

1825

Bap

Ann

4 Oct 1825



PP

1825

Bap

Hugh

18 Aug 1825



PP

1826

Bap

Benjamin Brindley

12 Oct 1826



PP

1826

Bap

Betty

1 Jan 1826



PP

1826

Bap

John

26 Mar 1826



PP

1827

Bap

Alice

26 Jan 1827



PP

1827

Bap

Ann

22 Sep 1827



PP

1827

Bap

Harriot

26 Jan 1827



PP

1827

Bap

John

25 Mar 1827



PP

1827

Bap

Mary

16 Dec 1827



PP

1827

Bap

Sarah Ann

10 Jun 1827



PP

1828

Bap

Ann

8 Feb 1828



PP

1828

Bap

Ann

15 Jun 1828



PP

1828

Bap

George

19 Oct 1828



PP

1828

Bap

Sarah

10 Feb 1828



PP

1829

Bap

Alice

12 Jul 1829



PP

1829

Bap

Charles Cooper

13 Sep 1829



PP

1829

Bap

James

5 Jun 1829



PP

1830

Bap

John

25 Apr 1830



PP

1831

Bap

Elizabeth

30 Jun 1831



PP

1831

Bap

George

24 Jul 1831



PP

1831

Bap

Hugh

30 Jun 1831



PP

1831

Bap

Samuel

16 Dec 1831



PP

1832

Bap

Alfred

16 Sep 1832



PP

1832

Bap

John

22 Apr 1832



PP

1833

Bap

James

28 Feb 1833



PP

1834

Bap

Charles

26 Jan 1834



PP

The above records lend themselves to conjecture on the origins and descendants of the Grimshaws in the Prestwich area.

It is hypothesized that the earliest Grimshaw was a John, who died in Prestwich 1671. He may have descended from the earliest recorded Grimshaw family in Eccleshill (see companion webpage), but he does not apparently show up on the descendant chart by Whitaker2. If he lived from about 1600 to 1671, he would have been a contemporary of the 14th generation descendants of Walter de Grimshaw of Eccleshill (including Thomas, John, Nicholas, Robert, Thomas, Mary, Jane, Margaret, Anne, Elizabeth, Eleanor, and Katherine Grimshaw).

It is further conjectured that this John Grimshaw had three sons – John, James and George – who all lived on or near Rooden Lane in Prestwich. Records indicate that they started their families about the same time, from 1681 to 1682. John apparently married Alice Crompton in 1676, and James married Maria Crompton in 1677, both in Prestwich. It appears that John died in 1708,
James in 1711, and George in 1709. Job Grimshaw may have been another brother, but his family didn’t start until some 20 years later, in 1704. So he may have been a son of one of the three brothers, although his birth is not included in the records.

John, James, George and Job Grimshaw all had children; they are summarized below with their dates of baptism (bp) or burial (bur):

John Grimshaw m. Alice Crompton 1676: Elizabeth, bur 1682; Alice, bp 1684; Ann, bp 1688; William, bp 1691 & bur 1691; James, bp 1693; Job, bp 1696; Phoebe, bp 1700; and Alice, bp 1704.

James Grimshaw m. Maria Crompton 1677: Elizabeth, bp 1681; James, bp 1686

George Grimshaw: Mary, bp 1683; Alice, bp 1684; Ann, bp 1687; James, bp 1688; Sarah, bp 1690; and George, bp 1693.

Job Grimshaw, as noted, started his family a bit later: George, bp 1704; Henry, bp 1708, and Josiah, bp 1710. This Job cannot be the one who was the seventh child of John Grimshaw (above), who was born in 1696 – too young to start a family in 1704.

Other records invite further conjecture or observation…

James Heywood married Margaret Grimshaw in 1697, who may have been Elizabeth (bp 1682), the daughter of John Grimshaw, or Elizabeth (pb 1681), the daughter of James Grimshaw.

James Fallows also married Elizabeth Grimshaw in 1708, who may have been the Elizabeth not married by James Heywood.

Thomas Kay also married an Elizabeth Grimshaw in 1712.

Thomas Scholes had a son by Ann Grimshaw (James); this Ann may have been the daughter of John (Ann bp 1588) or of George (Ann bp 1687).

Thomas Eckersley married Sarah Grimshaw in 1711, who may have been the daughter (bp 1690) of George Grimshaw. This couple may have had a son, Thomas (bp 1709), a couple of years before their marriage.

George Grimshaw married Anne Kay in 1725; this George (bp 1693) may have been the son of George Grimshaw, one of the three brothers who started the Grimshaw line in Prestwich. George and Anne may have had George Grimshaw (bp 1723) two years before their marriage.

It must be emphasized that the above observations are purely conjectural in the absence of clearer evidence in each case.

 George and Margaret Grimshaw Descendant Information

David Grimshaw has provided a very complete and valuable descendant chart for one of the Grimshaw lines of Prestwich, that of George and Elizabeth Grimshaw. An image of the chart, in two parts, is provided below, followed by an alternate form of presentation of the descendant information. George Grimshaw, at the top of the chart, would have been born in about 1800 if his firstborn was born when he was 21 years old. George has not yet been tied into the earlier family lines described in the preceding section.

The above chart is presented in alternate descendant chart format below.

 

George Grimshaw & Margaret (unknown)

|–2 Thomas Grimshaw (1821 – ?) & Charlotte

|–|–3 unknown son

|–|–3 unknown daughter

|–2 Job Grimshaw (1824 – ?) & Ann Jones. Married 26 Sep 1847, Manchester.

|–|–3 Betty Grimshaw (1855 – ) & Thomas Bleakley

|–|–|–4 Annie Bleakley & Tom Holden

|–|–|–4 Harry Bleakley & Anne

|–|–|–4 Earnest Bleakley

|–|–|–4 George Bleakley & Daisy

|–|–|–4 Arthur Bleakley

|–|–3 William Grimshaw (1859 – 1940) & Ellen Marsh (?- 1941)

|–|–|–4 Wilfred Grimshaw (1885 – ?) & Margaret Alice Jones

|–|–|–|–5 Dorothy Grimshaw (1913 – ) & Leslie Bradshaw

|–|–|–|–|–6 Margaret Lesley Bradshaw (1939 – ?) & Bernard Travis

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Sarah Travis (1972 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Arthur Richard Bradshaw (1945 – ?) & Brenda Roberts

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Jonathan Richard Bradshaw (1971 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Andrew David Bradshaw (1974 – ?)

|–|–|–|–5 Muriel Jones Grimshaw (1922 – ?) & Geoffrey Milburn Wootton (1924 – 1995)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Stephen Milburn Wootton (1951 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Gillian Margaret Wootton (1956 – ?) & Stephen Carter

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Melinda Rose Carter

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Bethany May Carter

|–|–|–|–5 Geoffrey Owen Grimshaw (1925 – ?) & Joan Hutchinson

|–|–|–|–|–6 David Grimshaw* & Ikoomi

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Naomi Grimshaw

|–|–|–|–|–6 David Grimshaw* & Lynne

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Tammy Lyn Grimshaw

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Barbara Ann Grimshaw

|–|–|–4 Harvey Grimshaw (1886 – 1886)

|–|–|–4 Ethel May Grimshaw (1887 – 1968) & William Kay

|–|–|–4 Percy Owen Grimshaw (1891 – 1985) & Sarah Brenda Ashton (? – 1966)

|–|–|–|–5 William Grimshaw (1922 – ?) & Rosemarie Metz (1931 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Paul William Grimshaw (1955 – ?) & Sandra Riley (1960 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Christopher Riley (1996 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Hayley Maureen Grimshaw (1998 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Alan James Grimsahw (1958 – ?) & Susan Williams (1958 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 Jennifer Grimshaw (1983 – ?)

|–|–|–|–5 Marjorie Patricia Grimshaw (1926 – ?) & Ronald Arthur Barnes (1920 – 1977)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Susan Mary Barnes (1954 – ?) & William Walmsley (1954 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–|–7 James William Walmseley (1981 – ?)

|–|–|–|–|–6 Pamela Jean Barnes (1955 – ?)

|–|–|–4 Pattie Grimshaw (1895 – ?)

|–|–|–4 Florence Grimshaw (1897 – ?)

|–|–|–4 Doris Grimshaw (1899 – ?) & Norman Roberts

|–|–|–|–5 Shirley Barbara Roberts (1929 – ?) & Derek Smith (1926 – ?)

|–|–|–4 Nellie Grimshaw (1890 – 1890)

|–|–3 Hannah Grimshaw (1867 – ?) & William Herbert Allen (1867 – ?)

|–|–|–4 William Allen (1890 – 1909)

|–|–|–4 Percy Allen (1893 – 1894)

|–|–|–4 Edith Allen & Frank Edwards

|–|–|–|–5 Jean Edwards & Gerald Watts

|–|–|–4 Annie Allen (1907 – ?) & Anthony Regamey

|–|–|–|–5 Joyce Regamey

|–|–|–|–5 Patricia Regamey

|–|–|–|–5 David Regamey Regamey

|–|–|–4 Harold Allen (1908 – 1908)

|–2 Betty Grimshaw (1826 – ?)

|–2 George Grimshaw (1828 – ) & Emma

|–|–3 Lizzie

|–|–3 Samuel

|–2 John Grimshaw & Alice

|–|–3 Clara Grimshaw & Wright Bleakley

|–|–3 James Grimshaw & Violet

|–|–|–4 Stanley

|–|–|–4 Rosie

|–|–|–4 unknown child

|–|–|–4 unknown child

|–2 David Grimshaw & Maria

|–|–3 unknown daughter

|–|–3 unknown son

 

Where Is Prestwich in Relation to Manchester?

Prestwich is located about five or six km northwest of the center of Manchester, as shown in the maps below.

Background Information on Prestwich from Wikipedia

Prestwich is well described on Wikipedia as shown below. Note the mention of the football fields referenced as “Grimshaw’s” under the section on Sports. David Grimshaw indicated that this land was donated by his grandfather, Wilfred Grimshaw.

Prestwich

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prestwich)

Population 31,693

Prestwich is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, in Greater Manchester, England. Historically part of Lancashire, the town lies between the neighbouring town of Whitefield and the cities of Manchester and Salford.

As can be seen from the map of 1848,[1] the oldest part of Prestwich developed around what is now, Bury new Road and is known locally as “Prestwich Village”. There is a large Jewish community in Prestwich, bordering with Higher Broughton in Salford to form the second-largest Orthodox Jewish community in the United Kingdom. This is where the Jewish community of Cheetham Hill in Manchester, which no longer exists as such, has fetched up.

Geography and administration

Prestwich was the ecclesiastical centre of Prestwich-cum-Oldham an ancient parish in the Salford Hundred of Lancashire,[2] and became the Prestwich Urban District under the Local Government Act 1894. It was granted a charter to become a municipal borough in 1939. Under the Local Government Act 1972 it became an unparished area in the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, now one of the ten boroughs of Greater Manchester.

Districts of Prestwich include:

Sedgley Park

Rainsough

Brooklands

The nature of Prestwich village changed massively in the 1970s, with the erection of the Longfield Shopping Centre. The construction of the motorways near Prestwich also altered the life and habits of the townspeople. In the 1970s, local government changes brought control of Prestwich under Bury Metropolitan Borough Council. It is somewhat different in character from Bury, however, and looks more towards Manchester and Salford. It is geographically nearer to Salford than to Bury.

Prestwich is bounded on its eastern side by Heaton Park, to the west by the Prestwich Forest Park and the Irwell Valley (Agecroft) and to the south by the City of Salford. The two main north-south roads passing from central Manchester to Bury, Bury New Road (A56) and Bury Old Road, traverse the district, .

History

Etymology

The name Prestwich is possibly of Saxon origin, derived from Priest Wic, which in Saxon translates to the priest’s farmed land. Another possible derivation of the town’s name is Priest’s Retreat, one of the village bars is named after this. Wich and wych are names used to denote brine springs or wells in England. Originally derived from the Latin vicus (place) by the 11th century, use of the ‘wich’ suffix in placenames was usually associated with towns involved with salt production.[3]

Economics

Prestwich is a self-contained community with a wide range of traditional and superstore shopping. The shops of the Jewish community in Prestwich give it a particular distinction.[4]

Demographics

There is an area of south Prestwich which is known as Sedgley Park. This area has a sizeable Jewish population, and there are many Jewish businesses, specialist shops and delicatessens along King’s Road, Bury New Road and Bury old Road.

There is also a large Irish Catholic community in Prestwich and the surrounding area, served by St Monica’s RC High School Specialist Language College located alongside Bury Old Road and Our Lady of Grace Primary School on Willow Road.

Religion and History

Bury New Road, which runs through the centre of Prestwich, roughly follows the line of a Roman road connecting Manchester to Longridge. It is believed that a Roman fort was built in Prestwich. Although its precise location is unknown it is thought that it may have been in the Castle Hill area, mirroring the fort on Rainsough Hill equidistant from the Roman Road. Roman coins have been found in Prestwich. Most have been found just off Bury New Road and near Prestwich Golf Course, however some have been found in Prestwich Clough about half a mile away from Prestwich village and Bury New Road.

The early history of Prestwich is inextricably linked with the church. Prestwich itself has very ancient origins, and at least for the early parts of its history, the fortunes of the village seem to have followed the fortunes of its parish church. It is known that a Rector of Prestwich existed by at least 1200. The present large parish church, at the end of Church Lane in the village centre, is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin and parts of it date from around 1500, although the last extensions were made at the end of the 19th century. It was the centre of the vast ancient ecclesiastical parish of Prestwich-cum-Oldham. For a time in the 19th century, the church was referred to locally as St Bartholomew’s, which could be attributed either to the unpopularity of the Blessed Virgin at the time, or to sheer ignorance. The Church Wakes were traditionally held around St Bartholomew’s Day, and this could have reinforced the error.

In 1849, St Margaret’s Church was erected near the gates of Heaton Park, originally as a chapel of ease to the parish church, but since 1885 as a parish church in its own right. The church was extended many times in the 19th cenutry, in 1863, 1871, 1884, 1888 and 1899. A particular feature of St Margaret’s Church, is the splendid Arts and Crafts Movement oak carving (including reredos, choir stalls, rood screen, panelling, pulpit, bishop’s chair, altar rails, etc.) by Arthur Simpson of Kendal, widely believed to be the finest collection of his ecclesiastical work.

Other Anglican churches in the area include churches dedicated to St Gabriel, St Hilda, and St George.

The Roman Catholic Church in Prestwich began to reappear in late Victorian times. Mass was celebrated in 1889 for the first time since the Reformation. The present Catholic church, dedicated to Our Lady of Grace, was opened in 1931 and consecrated in 1956. There are two local Methodist churches, Heaton Park Methodist Church and Prestwich Methodist Church.

In more recent times, the migration of Jewish families, mainly from Cheetham area of Manchester and Broughton Park in Salford, and later arrival of Muslims into this thriving urban area of Greater Manchester, resulted in the additional presence of synagogues and mosques, alongside Christian places of worship.

Places of interest

Heaton Park

Europe’s largest municipal park at 259 hectares (640 acres), Heaton Park, is situated to the east of Prestwich, within the City of Manchester. This was the ancient seat of the Earls of Wilton but was sold to Manchester Corporation in 1902. The park is 4 miles from Manchester city centre and although officially part of the City of Manchester, has a Prestwich postal address.[5]

Prestwich
Forest Park

Prestwich Forest Park consists of 200 hectares of land on the western side of Prestwich incorporating:

Philips Park

Prestwich Clough

Mere Clough

Waterdale Meadow

Drinkwater Park

While much of the area of the present park was industrialised during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries it has mostly now been returned to a more natural state with extensive woodlands, reservoirs and grasslands. While this area has become a haven for wildlife there are still remnants to be found of the area’s industrial past. Philips Park, Prestwich Clough and Waterdale Meadow are described in excellent downloadable illustrated leaflets produced by the Metropolitan Borough of Bury Environmental Services Department describing the history, wildlife and points of interest.[6][7] Drinkwater Park is described in a separate Wikipedia article. Philips park has been designated as a Local Nature Reserve (LNR) and Prestwich Clough as s Site of Biological Importance (SBI) due to the important contribution they make to the wildlife heritage of Greater Manchester. The Irwell Valley Sculpture Trail, The Irwell valley Way and a National Cycle Route all pass through the Park. The Friends of Prestwich Forest Park and the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers (BTCV) coordinate volunteer activities and events such as the Prestwich Clough Centenary Celebrations.[8][9] The BTCV have a permanent base in the renovated Philips Park Barn which has become a major environmental education and countryside centre for the borough.[10]

Sport

Football

The local amateur team which represents Prestwich is Prestwich Heys FC. For many years, Prestwich Heys played on the fields just off Heys Road, a site known as Grimshaw’s. The local high school, Prestwich High School as was (now the Arts College), obtained the land for use as their sports fields and Prestwich found a new home on Sandgate Road, just over the border in Whitefield. This field was near the site of the old St Joseph’s RC High School (which merged with St Peter’s RC High School, rebadged itself as St Monica’s RC High School and located itself on the St Peter’s site) and has been redeveloped to include enclosed concrete “fencing”, a car park and club facilities. Prestwich Heys currently play in the Manchester Football League. Other local sides include Bury Amateurs who play their home games at Drinkwater Park, Rainsough and also Prestwich Marauders who have various places where they play their home matches. These teams are usually in the North Bury League or the Bury and Radcliffe League.

Cricket

The main cricket club in Prestwich is Prestwich Cricket Club, which has been very successful over recent years. Located between Prestwich Metrolink station and the Grimshaw’s playing fields mentioned earlier, Prestwich CC also has crown green bowling and tennis facilities as well as a spacious clubhouse. Prestwich CC has been on this site for many years, with the clubhouse having many photos on display from previous teams and players.

References

http://web.archive.org/web/20081121144552/http://www.old-maps.co.uk/IndexMapPage2.aspx

http://www.mancuniensis.info/Maps/salfh_xs.pdf
retrieved 2007-11-02

Domesday Book

http://www.rochdaleobserver.co.uk/about/s/0/49_prestwich_advertiser.html

http://www.manchestergalleries.org/our-other-venues/heaton-hall/visitor-information/
Retrieved 2007-10-26

http://www.bury.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/519FF1DD-000A-4F50-A3CB-245980F3B067/0/PhilipsParkLNR.pdf
Retrieved 2007-10-26

http://www.bury.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/9ECF59AA-5F75-43E6-8114-65EF644F3ADD/0/PrestwichClough.pdf
Retrieved 2007-10-26

http://upcoming.yahoo.com/event/176936/
Retrieved 2007-10-26

Home Page

http://web.archive.org/web/20090429105219/http://www.bury.gov.uk:80/Environment/Planning/PlanningProjects/CountrysideAndWildlife/PrestwichFP.htm
Retrieved 2007-10-26

http://prestwichsnooker.com/index.php?s=8cf8066c1bc492705027a4a9df29e52f&act=idx

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/showbiz/s/216/216494_victoria_wood_to_return_to_drama.html

Montagu Lomax, The Experiences of an Asylum Doctor London: George Allen & Unwin 1921

BA Towers The management and politics of a public expose: the Prestwich Inquiry 1922 J Social Policy (1984) 13: 41-61

TW Harding, “Not worth powder and shot.” A reappraisal of Montagu Lomax’s contribution to mental health reform British Journal of Psychiatry (1990) 156: 180-187

Hopton Daily life in a 20th century psychiatric hospital: an oral history of Prestwich Hospital Int Hist Nurs J (1997) 2: 27-39

Hopton Prestwich Hospital in the twentieth century: a case study of slow and uneven progress in the development of psychiatric care History of Psychiatry (1999) 10: 349-369

 

Photo and Image from David Grimshaw

David initiated this webpage by providing the two images below. The first is a photo of Grimshaws Vauxhall many years ago. The second is an image of a flier for William Grimshaw, “Gramophone King”. Both of these images are described further down on this webpage.

William Grimshaw, Gramophone King

William Grimshaw owned a bicycle shop and began selling gramophones in the late 1800s or early 1900s. Apparently in connection with his promoting the new machine, William played the gramophone in public, which proved immensely popular for a period of time, drawing as many as 40,000 at Heaton Park. The following article is from the BBC online.

 

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/print/manchester/content/articles/2005/09/09/caruso_concert_090905_feature.shtml

 

 

If you took your stereo down to Heaton Park, how many people would turn up to listen? Almost a century before the BBC Proms in The Park, a Manchester gramophone salesman drew a crowd of 40,000 – playing his record collection!

BBC Proms in the Park takes place on Saturday with 15,000 people expected to turn out to watch the BBC Philharmonic perform live on stage in Heaton Park. The finale to the evening, will be a live link up with the Last Night of the Proms
in the Royal Albert Hall for a flag-waving patriotic sing-along.

It’s the first time the Proms event has gone urban – and been staged in a city venue. But Heaton Park has a tradition of playing classical music to the masses which dates back almost a century…

Gramophone King: William Grimshaw

That tradition was started early last century by William Grimshaw from Prestwich. Grimshaw originally sold bicycles from his shop on Bury New Rd but expanded his trade to include the new invention of the day – the gramophone.

In 1909, William Grimshaw listened to the great Italian tenor Enrico Caruso perform at the Free Trade Hall. He wanted to share this experience with the ordinary people of Manchester so, a few days later, he took his gramophone to Heaton Park and played recordings of Caruso to an assembled crowd of 40,000 people!

“He always liked the public and I think that was why: because he wanted to bring pleasure, to bring music to people who weren’t able to afford it”

Susan Cahal

Local papers such as the Manchester Evening Chronicle and the Crumpsall Guardian reported that the trams from Manchester and Bury were unable to cope with the huge numbers of concert-goers.

An extract from the Sound Wave and Talking Machine Record, printed in December 1909 reports the occasion as follows:

“In the course of his tour of the provinces, Signor Caruso’s engagements took him to Manchester on September 13 and with his usual enterprise, Mr Grimshaw gave a Gramophone concert in Heaton Park on the following Sunday embracing all the items sung by Caruso… A vast crowd, estimated to number at least 40,000 assembled to hear the Gramophone.”

Caruso himself wrote to Mr Grimshaw expressing his thanks and appreciation of the way his voice had been reproduced. He even sent Grimshaw a signed cartoon of himself! (see below)

Caruso: by Caruso

Photographs show crowds dressed formally in Edwardian suits and dresses, wearing caps and hats all listening attentively. Indeed, in the words of the Prestwich and Heaton Park Guardian…

“…
they remained as if spellbound from the moment of arrival to the close of the programme, which, it is hardly necessary to say, was intensely enjoyed.”

Grimshaw was the first man in England to give gramophone concerts in the open and the idea spread rapidly around the country. He was soon contracted by Manchester Corporation to hold them in Heaton Park for several seasons and the popularity of these events grew and grew.

In effect, he was the very first club DJ in the world. And for his tour bus? He used a Prestwich Co-op horse-drawn milk cart to transport his equipment to the Park.

William Grimshaw’s great-granddaughter is Susan Cahal who lives in Radcliffe. She says his concerts were so popular he became known across Lancashire as the Gramophone King.

“He always liked the public and I can only imagine that was why: because he wanted to bring pleasure, to bring music to people who weren’t able to afford machines in the home.

A poster of one of Grimshaw’s concerts

“In 1907, he told the Manchester Corporation that an extra large horn would enable large crowds of people who couldn’t afford equipment of their own to hear music in the open air which was becoming available on records.”

She added: “As things were at the time, they didn’t have the same publicity to advertise events, and I think it was absolutely wonderful and very far seeing.”

Far seeing indeed. Almost 100 years later, Heaton Park will be filled with the sounds of classical music again thanks to Proms in the Park. Grimshaw, I think, would approve.

last updated: 09/09/05

The Gramophone King as Described in “Surprising Lancashire”

David Grimshaw provided the following image of a chapter from “Surprising Lancashire1“, which is on the history of Lancashire.
This chapter provides additional detail on William Grimshaw’s success in playing the gramophone for the public early in the 20th century.

Additional Gramophone King Photos from David Grimshaw

In March 2013 David Grimshaw provided an excellent picture of William Grimshaw with his gramphone, which is shown below. It is an excellent version of the photo shown above.

David also sent several photos of a park where a gramophone performance was underway. The photo shown below was chosen for this webpage because it clearly shows the gramophone near the center of the photo along with the sizeable crowd that turned out for the performance.

Shown below is an image of a second handbill provided by David Grimshaw (in addition to the one shown above on this webpage).

Grimshaws Vauxhall, an Auto Dealership in Prestwich

William Grimshaw’s bicycle evolved over time to the current auto dealership, Grimshaws Vauxhall. The dealership website can be visited by clicking here. The website is summarized below, followed by a brief description of the Vauxhall Automotive Company, which is owned by General Motors of the USA. Note the brief statement and signature of Alan Grimshaw, great-grandson of William Grimshaw.

Welcome to Grimshaws Vauxhall

Our business is built on personal relationships. That is as true now as it was in 1882 when my great grandfather established the first enterprise to carry the Grimshaws name. Much has changed in the intervening years but, as we are about to celebrate our 125th year in business the people we are proud to call both clients and friends are still our paramount concern.

MANAGING DIRECTOR

GRIMSHAWS VAUXHALL PRESTWICH Bury New Road, Prestwich, Manchester. M25 3BD

Background InformationVauxhall Motors Limited

Vauxhall Motors

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Motors)

Vauxhall Motors Limited

Type Private (subsidiary of General Motors since 1925)

Founded 1903

Headquarters Luton, Bedfordshire, England

Revenue £3,785 million (2004)

Operating income £131 million (2004)[1]

Net income £-176 million (2004) [1]

Employees 5,047 (2004)[1]

Parent General Motors Corporation

Website www.vauxhall.co.uk

Vauxhall Motors is a UK car company. It is a subsidiary of General Motors. Most current Vauxhall models are right-hand drive derivatives of GM’s Opel brand with several performance vehicles coming from Holden/Holden Special Vehicles in Australia and Lotus Cars of Norfolk, England (owned by Malaysia’s Proton).

 

History

Alexander Wilson founded the company in Vauxhall, London in 1857. Originally named Alex Wilson and Company, then Vauxhall Iron Works, the company built pumps and marine engines. In 1903, the company built its first car, a five-horsepower model steered using a tiller, with two forward gears and no reverse gear. This led to a better design which was made available for sale.

To expand its production, the company moved the majority of its production to Luton in 1905. The company continued to trade under the name Vauxhall Iron Works until 1907, when the modern name of Vauxhall Motors was adapted. The company was characterised by its sporting models, but after World War I, designed more austere models.

GM purchase

In 1925, Vauxhall was bought by GM for US$2.5 million. The influence of the American parent was pervasive and together with the Ford Motor Company, Vauxhall’s main competitor, led to a wave of American influenced styling in Europe that persisted through to the 1980s. Bedford Vehicles, a subsidiary constructing commercial vehicles, was established in 1930 as the Stock Market Crash of 1929 had made importing American lorries uneconomical.

During World War II, car production was suspended to allow Vauxhall to work on the Churchill tank, which was designed at Luton in less than a year, and assembled there (as well as at other sites). Over 5,600 Churchill tanks were built.

Post World War II

After the war, car production resumed but models were designed as a more mass-market product leading to expansion of the company. A manufacturing plant at Ellesmere Port was built in 1960. During the 1960s Vauxhall acquired a reputation for making rust-prone models, though in this respect most manufacturers were equally bad. The corrosion protection built into models was tightened up significantly, but the reputation dogged the company until the early 1980s.

By the late 1960s, the company was achieving five-figure sales on its most popular models including the entry-level Viva and larger Victor.

21st Century

The first years of the 21st century saw Vauxhall further strengthen its position in the British market, and continue to narrow the gap with Ford. The Corsa was regenerated in 2000 and offered a better-handling, better-built and better-equipped package than ever before.

2002 was one of the best years ever for Vauxhall sales in the UK. The updated Corsa (launched in 2000) was Britain’s second most popular new car, and gave the marque top spot in the British supermini car sales charts for the very first time. The Astra was Britain’s third best selling car that year, while the Vectra and the Zafira (a clever Compact MPV launched in 1999) lurked just outside the top ten with relatively strong sales.

Closures and restructuring

Vauxhall announced that the Luton car plant would close in 2000, with the final vehicle being made in March 2003, but production still continues at the plant in Ellesmere Port. Manufacture of vans (sold under the Vauxhall, Opel and in some cases Renault) badges throughout Europe) continues at the IBC Vehicles plant in Luton.

On 17 May 2006 Vauxhall announced the loss of 900 jobs from Ellesmere Port’s 3,000 staff. Despite already meeting efficiency targets Vauxhall has been told to further improve productivity. Vauxhall’s troubled parent GM is cutting 30,000 jobs in the United States. [1]

Origins of the name and the logo

The griffin emblem, which is still in use, is derived from the coat of arms of Fulk le Breant, a mercenary soldier who was granted the Manor of Luton for services to King John in the thirteenth century. By marriage, he also gained the rights to an area near London, south of the Thames. The house he built, Fulk’s Hall, became known in time as Vauxhall. Vauxhall Iron Works adopted this emblem from the coat of arms to emphasise its links to the local area. When Vauxhall Iron Works moved to Luton in 1905, the griffin emblem coincidentally returned to its ancestral home.

The logo (as pictured) used to be square however now, it is circular.

 

David Grimshaw has provided the two photos below of Wm Grimshaw’s garage in 1910 and a later photo as well. The second photo is the same as the one above from the car dealership website.

Interesting Grimshaw Anecdote from the “Daily Mirror”

An interesting article on parishioners charged with keeping church attendees awake and alert was published in the Daily Mirror on 11/12/1986. It mentions a George Grimshaw, who was paid 13s in 1786 for performing this valuable function as well as being responsible to “whip out dogs, keep children quiet, and clean both pulpit and walks.” This George could be the one described in the preceding section but it is unlikely. If he was just 21 in 1786, he would have been 56 years old when his first child was born in 1821.

Is Francis Grimshaw, Apparent Emigrant to America, Descended from the Prestwich Grimshaws?

American immigrant Francis Bowker Grimshaw (see companionwebpage) was apparently born in Cheetham, which is located close to Prestwich. Based only on geographic proximity at this time, it is hypothesized that Francis’ apparent father, Richard D Grimshaw, and grandmother, Mary Grimshaw, were descended from one of the Prestwich Grimshaw lines.

Edward Grimshaw, Immigrant to America, with Ancestors in Prestwich

Edward Grimshaw, and immigrant to Vermont in the United States, is a seventh generation descendant of a Grimshaw family line in Prestwich (see companion webpage). Edward’s ancestry and descendant chart is shown below with Edward indicated in bold and italic font. Edward’s earliest ancestor, James Grimshaw (married Elizabeth Guest) has apparently not yet been connected to other identified Prestwich Grimshaw lines.

James Grimshaw (bef 1613 – 1886, Rooden Lane) & Elizabeth Guest* (1644, Prestwich – 1674, Prestwich). Married 11 Sep 1638, St Mary’s Prestwick

 

|—1James Grimshaw (1618 – 1660)

 

|—1George Grimshaw (? – 1709, Rooden Lane) & Maria Rollinson (1654, Prestwich – 1711, Rooden Lane). Married 30 Oct 1673, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—2 Job Grimshaw (1674 – ?)

 

|—|—2 James Grimshaw (1676 – 1688)

 

|—|—2 Elizabeth Grimshaw (1679 – ?)

 

|—|—2 Mary Grimshaw (1682 – ?)

 

|—|—2 Alice Grimshaw (1683 – ?)

 

|—|—2 Ann Grimshaw (1687 – ?)

 

|—|—2 Sarah Grimshaw (1690 – 1758)

 

|—|—2 George Grimshaw (1683, Prestwich – 1761, Prestwich) & Sarah Wild (? – 1750, Hardman’s Fold). Married 17 Aug 1725, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—|—3 James Grimshaw (1725 – 1809)

 

|—|—|—3 John Grimshaw (1728 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 Samuel Grimshaw (1730 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 Mary Grimshaw (1733 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 Martina Grimshaw (1736 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 George Grimshaw (1739, Prestwich – 7 Sep 1813, Prestwich) & Lydia Dargyshire (? – bur 29 Nov 1765). Married 19 Feb 1765, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—|—3 George Grimshaw (1739, Prestwich – 7 Sep 1813, Prestwich) & Mary Berry (1743 – 15 Aug 1827, Prestwich). Married 28 Mar 1769, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—|—|—4 Richard Grimshaw (1770 – 1828)

 

|—|—|—|—4 George Grimshaw (1772 – 1791)

 

|—|—|—|—4 Samuel Grimshaw (1774 – 1831)

 

|—|—|—|—4 John Grimshaw (1777 – 1779)

 

|—|—|—|—4 Sarah Grimshaw (1779 – 1783)

 

|—|—|—|—4 William Grimshaw (1782 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—4 Hugh Grimshaw (1786, Prestwich – 1836, Prestwich) & Mary Maddocks (1789 – 1835, Prestwich). Married 17 Jul 1808, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Jane Grimshaw (1809 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Ralph Grimshaw (1810 – 1835)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Ellen Grimshaw (1812 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 George Grimshaw (1813 – 1836)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Edward Grimshaw (1815 – 1816)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Edward Grimshaw (1817 – 1836)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 John Grimshaw (26 Jul 1820, Prestwich – 1863, Prestwich) & Sarah Walker (1827, Great Heaton – 1902, Prestwich). Married 5 Apr 1853, St Mary’s Prestwich.

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—6 Hugh Grimshaw (1854 – 1861)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—6 Edward Grimshaw (24 Apr 1857, Prestwich – 27 Dec 1924, Hartford, CT) & Mary Ann Heywood (Oct 1858, England – ?). Married 9 or 13 Oct 1881, Oldham, Lancashire.

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 Hugh Edward Grimshaw (1882 or 15 Oct 1888, Prestwich – 18 Jul 1947, Rutland, VT) & Frances Gates Stockwell (Nov 1891, Vermont – ?). Married 1 Feb 1913, Cavendish, Vermont.

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—|—8 Helen Mary Grimshaw (3 Oct 1914, Ludlow, VT – 29 Dec 1999, Springfield, VT) & David A Rock. Married 25 May 1946, Ludlow, VT

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—|—8 Norman Stockwell Grimshaw (5 Mar 1919, Ludlow, VT – 20 Aug 2012, Rutland, VT) & Patricia M Gertisser or Mulcahy. Married 16 Sep 1946, Rutland, VT.

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 Walter Grimshaw (1884 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 Sarah H or Ellen Grimshaw (1887 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 May Grimshaw (1889 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 Ada Mary  Grimshaw (15 Sep 1892 – 22 Jul 1978)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—|—7 Clara Grimshaw (1896 1977)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—6 George Grimshaw (1859 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—|—6 John Grimshaw (1863 – ?)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Mary Ann Grimshaw (1822 – 1839)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Hugh Grimshaw (1824 – 1825)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Benjamin Brindley Grimshaw (1826  1827)

 

|—|—|—|—|—5 Sarah Grimshaw (1828 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 Sarah Grimshaw (1742 – ?)

 

|—|—|—3 Job Grimshaw (1744 – ?)

 

|—1 J ob Grimshaw (1639 – ?)

 

|—1 Elizabeth Grimshaw (1640 – 1653)

 

|—1 James Grimshaw (1643 – 1649)

 

|—1 James Grimshaw  1650 – 1653)

 

|—1 Nathan Grimshaw (1652 – 1654)

 

|—1 Elizabeth Grimshaw (1656 – 1681)

 

|—1 Ann Grimshaw (1658 – ?)

 

*Parents of Elizabeth Guest were Job Guest (1590 – 1660) & Margery Bullowe (1590 – ?)

 

Soruces: SPC Family Tree, Hodge Family Tree,

 

References

1Aspin, Chris, 1988, Surprising Lancashire: Accrington, Helmshore Local History Society, Printed by Caxton Printing Co.

2Whitaker, Thomas Dunham, 1872, An History of the Original Parish of Whalley, and Honor of Clitheroe (Revised and enlarged by John G. Nichols and Ponsonby A. Lyons): London, George Routledge and Sons, 4th Edition; v. I, 362 p.; v. II, 622 p. Earlier editions were published in 1800, 1806, and 1825.

Home Page

Webpage posted December 2007. Upgraded April 2013 with reorganization and addition of two photos related to William Grimshaw, “Gramophone King”. Also with addition of Edward Grimshaw, immigrant to Vermont, with ancestors in Prestwich.